‘Introducing Gabriel Latchin Trio’ – Gabriel Latchin Trio

Intr Gabriel Latchin

THE SARTORIAL cover-art purity of Introducing Gabriel Latchin Trio seems in tune with the pianist’s classic approach to this enduring format – and from the outset, the formative, stylistic influences of Oscar Peterson and Art Tatum are frequently evident across eleven numbers which balance four of Latchin’s compositions with seven, elegant interpretations of standards.

A debut solo release from the first-call London-based sideman, it suggests a strong partnership with double bassist Tom Farmer and drummer Josh Morrison; the piano trio environment, as always, shining a shadowless arc light on every technical and artistic nuance from each player. They do it so well, evoking that exciting, first-time experience of the three-faceted acoustic alchemy of, say, Peterson, Bill Evans or George Shearing, and this straight-ahead recording certainly brings heartwarmed cheer.

Amongst the increasingly colourful hybridisation of jazz, bebop remains effulgent in the right hands, and both Edgar Sampson’s Stompin’ at the Savoy and Cole Porter’s Can’t We Be Friends are interpreted with panache, the latter providing the space for Latchin’s precise, walking stride and carefree, high-line embellishments. The pianist’s ability, also, to compositionally complement some of those familiar time-honoured tunes is a great strength, his own brightly swinging, contrary-motion Carlora perfectly at home alongside a snappy reading of It Had To Be You.

Classy gems abound here, including Lush Life, whose piano ornaments and low, chromatic descents are not unlike those in Billy Strayhorn’s own recordings; the gorgeously slow-rolling blues of Lover Man which, perhaps more than any other in this selection, picks up on Oscar’s delicious characteristics; and sumptuous harmonies in If I Only Had a Brain (from ‘The Wizard of Oz’), dancing to the crisp soft-shuffle of Farmer’s and Morrison’s rhythm.

The changes in Frank Loesser’s ‘Slow Boat to China’ are a popular basis for new composition and, intentionally, those same climbing phrases in Latchin’s Off the Latch (‘grand title) are recognisable – an ebullient, sparkling showcase indeed. Trane Hopping – one of the pianist’s early blues, inspired by John Coltrane’s ‘Giant Steps’ – swings with great parity through the trio (a pleasure to hear the exuberance of Tom Farmer here, away from his more contemporary project adventures); and Blues for Billy, Latchin’s tribute to the great drummer Billy Higgins, feels like a memory of a favourite classic-in-the-tradition with its perky acciaccatura and major/minor piano personality.

This CD has been spinning for some time… and never loses its sheen, nor its smile.

Released on 15 September 2017, Introducing Gabriel Latchin Trio is available as CD or digital download at Bandcamp.

 

Gabriel Latchin piano
Tom Farmer bass
Josh Morrison drums

gabriellatchin.com

Alys Jazz – AJ 1501 (2017)

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