REVIEW: ‘Torus’ – James Lindsay

THE WEAVE of warm, incisive melody and textural detail heard in bassist/composer James Lindsay’s Strand (his 2017 debut as leader) takes flight in this new album – a vibrant blend of folk-rock that radiates positivity, freedom and adventure.

Torus, in geometrical, natural and cosmological terms, is explained as ‘a spiralling flow of energy, constantly refreshing and influencing itself’ and informs this recorded “exploration of the flows which connect us to our world, and a reminder that change is our only constant”. Communicating those themes, Lindsay integrates himself within the body of an eight-piece instrumental line-up that drives his latest compositions with renewed vigour, certainly ramped-up from the relative homeyness of his original release. That said, amongst its high-energy rock riffs – from a core of electric guitar, keyboards, sax, bass, drums and percussion – the beguiling timbres and inflections of accordion and fiddle firmly root these nine numbers in the evolving folk-music heritage of the bassist’s native Scotland.

Also a member of renowned folk band Breabeach, and with various awards accolades to his name, Glasgow-based Lindsay’s approach to composition and arrangement feels both meticulous and open. There’s a clear sense of journeying threaded through his work that creates a fulgent or sometimes smirr-streaked soundtrack quality. Indeed, though the titles’ sources are varied, the strongest impressions are of Scottish coastal or heather-rich landscapes, with the ever-changing visual and meteorological contrasts they present (aligned to the album’s aspects of regeneration and renewal).

Optimistically-emerging Lateral Roots establishes Lindsay’s intent in an ebullient, contemporary folk-rock reel warmed by the particularly effective textural mesh of unison accordion and sax; and Ben MacDonald’s skittering, hammer-style improvisations can be fleetingly reminiscent of Allan Holdsworth or John Clark. Observatory’s sky-wide ambience brings forth the delightful, rapidly-articulated dance of fiddle and accordion, backed by a crashing, 1980s-hued pop groove; and in Electroreceptor (a system of tissues in a living organism that enables electrical power), suitably syncopated rhythms spark a buzz of overlapping soul-funk conversations throughout its instrumentation. The bass-rasping, synth-laden vigour of Lewisian Complex (referencing north-west Scotland’s ancient, craggy outcrops) has tremors of Depeche Mode or The Human League; but again, it’s fuelled by jazz-rock guitar and vibrant Scots colour, pausing only for the misty Gaelic vocal of Deirdre Graham.

Kalimba droplets and crunchy Rhodes chords prepare the ground for Cycles’ theme-tune riffs and solid beats, while ritualistically-dancing Skekler (a guiser involved in an ancient Shetland custom of banishing winter that includes the beating of wooden staves) culminates in the vehement pound of percussion, urgent fiddle and power chords. Taking Lindsay back to an old haunt, The Smiddy’s chirpy folk melodies become lusciously underpinned at one point by Moog bass, and Jinibara (the indigenous people of Queensland, Australia – an area once visited by the bassist) is similarly uplifting. To close, the first-light clarity of Holon’s accordion and bass seemingly rises to greet the sun, coruscating with a tapestry of guitar, fiddle and sax.

At times, the narrative of this music might benefit from greater fluctuations of light and shade, occasionally reducing the density to create space (as heard in that pool of atmospheric, vocal serenity) or even a near-silence that might portray dark sky zones, north of the border. But, imagined as the basis – or forerunner – of a mixed-media concept or screenplay score, James Lindsay’s evocations characteristically brim with vitality.

Produced by respected jazz and folk musician/engineer Euan Burton, Torus is released on 23 April 2021 and available as a limited-edition CD, or digital download, at Bandcamp.

 

Angus Lyon accordion
Ben MacDonald electric guitars
Deirdre Graham vocals (on Lewisian Complex)
Jack Smedley fiddle
John Lowrie keyboard
James Lindsay bass guitar, electric guitar, Moog
Norman Wilmore alto saxophone
Scott Mackay drums
Signy Jakobsdottir percussion

Illustration: ‘Observatory’ by Alice Strange

jameslindsaymusic.com

OIR Recordings – OIRCD002 (2021)

REVIEW: ‘Le Chat Brel’ – Gabriel Bismut & Maurizio Minardi

RECORDINGS such as The Cook the Clown the Monk and the Accordionist and Piano Ambulance provided a personal introduction to the characterful music of Italian composer, accordionist and pianist Maurizio Minardi, having seen him perform some years ago in London. So it’s no surprise that new album Le Chat Brel – his collaboration with French violinist Gabriel Bismut – has grown into a complete listening delight.

Their entrancingly rounded quartet is completed by guitarist Barthélemy Seyer and double bassist Maurizio Congiu, plus guest harpist Livia Ferrandon-Bescond. Twelve original compositions of Bismut and Minardi – six apiece – are performed with jocose or romantic spirit through an evocative melding of their jazz/folk/baroque sensibilities (European union – stronger together, as so many of us well know). The album title’s feline ‘Brel’ reference links to their appreciation, and sometimes their live interpretations, of the music of Jacques Brel.

While the timbres of violin/alto and accordion have long complemented each other, there’s something inherently natural about the way their own creations are fashioned, right down to details which often reflect the pieces’ titles. So, for example, there’s the impulsive scratch and busyness of MInardi’s Le Coq Baroque, as well as cheery, shuffling Penguin (an irresistible tune from his Cook album, in the mould of The Divine Comedy or, appropriately, the Penguin Cafe Orchestra). The two composers are certainly well-matched. Holiday atmospheres in Bismut’s blithe Persévérence are given a lovely depth by his alto instrument, complemented by Seyer’s lithe guitar improvisations; and Endurance’s sunny, Parisian demeanour steals the heart.

More contemplative numbers such as Fleur Du Hasard and Per I Tuoi 28 Anni sigh with wistful, spatial elegance, their intimacy enhanced by the closeness of this recording. La Brume too, supported by hazy electric guitar textures, feels melancholic as shared violin and accordion melodies evoke illuminated riverside vistas of gently-rippling reflection. And two sumptuous Bismut compositions, Bipolarité and Peau, Neuve – the latter contrasting hymnal quietude with improvisational freedom – are sensitively enhanced by the harp of Livia Ferrandon-Bescond.

But the joyful vigour of this quartet’s interaction is always bound to resurface – firstly in Minardi‘s gypsy-jazz Anastasia, where Bismut’s bluegrass-suggested portamenti gleefully dance over its infectious rhythms; and then in galloping Tulipano Nero, whose anticipatory, Vivaldian drama is summoned by chattering accordion and Danse Macabre-style double-stopping and brash soloing (all brilliant ensemble-playing that has to be heard). As a final curtain call, sneering tango Marcello struts into colorized vaudeville – a great summation of this album’s seductive entertainment.

Le Chat Brel is released on 13 November 2020 and available here.

Videos: trailer, Endurance, Persévérence.

 

Gabriel Bismut violin, alto
Maurizio Minardi accordion
Barthélemy Seyer guitar
Maurizio Congiu double bass
with
Livia Ferrandon-Bescond harp (tracks 8, 11)

mauriziominardi.com/bismut-minardi

AMA – AMA 01 (2020)

REVIEW: ‘Northern Migrations’ – Francesco Turrisi

Francesco Turrisi_300px

THE NAME of pianist Francesco Turrisi has graced many a fine recording. As well as collaborating with artists including saxophonist Dave Liebman and vocalists Bobby McFerrin and Maria Pia de Vito, he has produced a number of his own albums as leader (2014’s Grigio especially memorable) and is a mainstay of Christina Pluhar’s visionary early music ensemble L’Arpeggiata.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 2 April 2018 and available as CD or digital download at Bandcamp.

 

Francesco Turrisi piano, accordion, frame drum

francescoturrisi.com

Taquin Records / TAQCD004 (2018)

REVIEW: ‘Soldiering On’ – The Dissolute Society

HATS OFF (bowler style, if you like) to trombonist Raph Clarkson and his eight-piece ensemble of musical mavericks in the creation of Soldiering On – a kaleidoscopic and often avant garde debut release from The Dissolute Society, with guests including Huw Warren (piano, accordion) and Mia Marlen Berg (vocals, effects).

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 11 May 2018 and available as CD or digital download from Bandcamp.

 

Fini Bearman vocals
Raph Clarkson trombone, vocals
Laura Jurd trumpet
Naomi Burrell violin
Zosia Jagodzinska cello
Gustav Clarkson viola
Phil Merriman keys, synth bass
Simon Roth drums
with special guests
Huw Warren piano, accordion
Mia Marlen Berg vocals, FX
Joshua Idehen vocals
Mike Soper trumpet

thedissolutesociety.com

Babel Label – BDV16145 (2018)

 

 

‘Passport’ – Omar Rahbany

passport

STAMPED with kaleidoscopic impressions from around the globe, Lebanese pianist Omar Rahbany’s Passport is a sumptuous fusion of jazz, orchestral and world music, presented by more than one hundred and eighty collaborators from twelve different nations.

Read the full review at LondonJazz News…

Released in the UK on 18 April 2017, Passport can be purchased at Amazon.
Audio samples and information at Omar Rahbany’s Facebook artist page.

 

Omar Rahbany piano, keyboards, additional bezok

Individual artists listed mostly in track-sequence appearance:
Ghada Nehme
vocals
Christopher Michael drums, Brazilian and miscellaneous percussion
Tony Dib accordion
Trad Trad clarinet
Steve Rodby acoustic bass
Raymond Hage percussion, Arabic percussion
Cuong Vu trumpet
Wayne Krantz electric guitar
Ali Madbouh ney, mezmar
Keith Carlock drums
Elie Afif electric bass
Andrew Hachem vocals
Faraj Hanna bezok, oud
Scott Harrell trumpets
Judy Lee horns
Timothy Albright trombones
Morris Kainuma tuba
Claud Chalhoub violin
Khachatur Savzyan double bass
Tom Hornig soprano saxophone
Nidal Abou Samra alto, tenor and baritone saxophones, trumpet
Karim Ziad drums
Jihad Assaad kanoon
Raed Boukamel ney
Jessy Jleilaty, Mirna Ileilaty Abdo, Andree Dib female chorus
Simon Obeid, Nader Khoury, Elie Khayat, Gilbert Jalkh, Tony Azar male chorus
Loyal El Mir vocals
Rami Maalouf flute
José Fernandez guitar
Alain Makdessi electric guitar

The Kiev City Symphonic Orchestra conducted by Volodymyr Sirenko
Members of the Lebanese Philharmonic Orchestra
additional strings

omarrahbany.com

Rahbany Yahya Productions (2017)

‘ELDA trio’ – ELDA trio

ELDA

THE VOICE that launched… well, a whole new expression of jazz unveils her eponymous debut recording with Slovenian accordionist/vocalist Janez Dovč and Brazilian-born percussionist/vocalist Adriano Adewale – ELDA trio.

Over the last few years, award-winning Swedish singer Emilia Mårtensson has graced a number of fine recordings, such as those of Kairos 4tet (including Everything We Hold) and her own solo albums (the most recent, Ana). Based in London, she is unsurprisingly in demand for various jazz and cross-genre projects, the dexterity, warmth and Anglo-Swedish clarity of her voice so fascinatingly distinctive and desirable.

Mårtensson explains that the concept of providing a confluence for their own cultural and musical experiences was an exciting prospect for the trio – the idea of creating, through the folk music/tales of their three countries of origin, a space to develop and express new compositions with differently-timbred voices, traditional instruments and electronics. From the resultant twelve tracks – mixed, mastered and produced with the reputable expertise of Alex Killpartrick and Chris Hyson – unfolds an atmospheric, enchanting thread of emotion, longing and joy which feels as peerless as it is beautiful.

Much of the album was conceived by Mårtensson in Izola, on the coast of Slovenia; so it’s greatly inspired by the sea, especially her grandparents’ story of how they moved from Slovenia to Sweden (and her empathy with accordion music stems from the impression made on her by her grandfather’s talent for the instrument). So a strong element of adventure and journeying is evident both in Mårtensson’s sincere delivery of her poetic lyrics (“I’ll always remember when the moon fell asleep behind the hill”) and in the chameleonic chordal and percussive invention which Dovč and Adewale supply – and that sense of the unknown, throughout, holds the attention.

Dusky memories in Stone Agaton are emphasised by Adewale’s deep chantings, accompanied by earthy percussion; and songwriter Jamie Doe’s positive, accordion-pulsed love ode, Winter, appears to sneer at the darkest season (“So put on all your jumpers and scream around the house”). Homely, descending chromatics, along with Mårtensson’s warm, high tones, are a joy in Barnaby Keen’s The Air Holds a Memory, whilst the contrasting themes of exile in Aleksandrinke touch the heart, emphasised by the watery swell of udu; and tranquil, overlaid vocals alone in To the Sun, To the Moon evoke cool, clear skies above silhouetted forests.

Rhythmic Mårtensson/Dovč composition Hon Och Han might suggest it has long been rooted in tradition (redolent of, say, Trio Mediæval’s output), even with an anthemic, Coldplay-like chorus; and following, sustained by bass synth, the vocals of Dovč’s slow, mysterious The Tree cry upwards to the moon. Quirky hoots, squeaks and clangs in Jac Jones’ Ellis Dreams are interspersed with a blithe vocal/synth melody; and the hollow, echoic interpretation of Swedish folk song Remembering/Vem Kan Segla further confirms Mårtensson’s clear communication with Dovč’s sensitive accordion phrasing.

A mesmerising solo from Adewale – I am dreaming with you – is quietly disconcerting, with shouts and percussive rattles three-dimensionally coming in and out of range through the darkness; the Konnakol introduction of Dovč’s Tillsammans curiously evolves into a hint of melodic, swingin’ Sixties; and Adewale’s trio curtain-call, Lobo Guara, fizzes with joie de vivre (Emilia perhaps overdoing it on the punsch!).

Catalogue it in ‘jazz’, ‘folk’ or ‘world’… wherever, ELDA trio is a beautiful experience.

Released on Two Rivers Records, on 23 September 2016, and available from Bandcamp.

 

Emilia Mårtensson vocals
Janez Dovč accordion, synth bass, electronics, vocals
Adriano Adewale percussion, vocals

eldatrio.com

Two Rivers Records – TRR014 (2016)