‘Identity’ – Patrick Lester-Rourke

CD DigiPak 6 Panel 1 Tray

PATRICK LESTER-ROURKE’s debut release arrives with no preconceptions. An undiscovered hour-long statement from a young and hitherto unknown musician. But its eclecticism and multifariousness – presented with an overarching, homemade ardency – makes Identity beguiling.

A graduate of Birmingham Conservatoire, the audio engineer, composer and performer was inspired by the concept of Miles Davis’ seminal 1970 double album Bitches Brew; specifically the idea of assembling an experimentally receptive ensemble to produce fresh, extended diversities of sound. That said, Lester-Rourke and his twelve collaborators (see below) create a musical landscape which is far from inaccessible, segueing elements of jazz, folk, pop/rock, prog and funk with free improvisation, electronic washes and audio soundbites.

Such a melange could be perceived as a lack of identity – yet Lester Rourke fashions it creatively, so there’s no let-up in a rhythmical and textural richness which also interweaves intangible retro glimmers of television soundtrack. The unfolding, flailing mystery of An-ka erupts into echoic, Israeli-inflected alto saxophone and ascending violin over crashing electric guitar and a cacophonous wall of sound, whilst expansive Soor-yo-day‘s gradual progression is exotically coloured with Spanish guitar and trumpet, seized upon by rapid-fire heavy rock.

But it’s not all climactic drama. Drus-ka-moma‘s mischievous bass clarinet figure sets up a spiralling gypsy-fiddle dance from Ning-Ning Li, its solid backing including trumpet, tremulant organ and bubbling synth, all carried on a wave of syncopated hand clapping; and Ow-in na shoor‘s folksy ’60s vibe features an attractive guitar round which is disseminated throughout the band.

There’s a splendid double bass, wah-wah guitar and bass synth funk groove to Get Movin’, prompting infectiously chattering organ as well as trumpet/sax banter between Alex Astbury and Josh Scofield (the raw, unpolished feel is rather charming). Scratchy guitar-rock Tear it Down channels The Sweet, Nirvana or Kaiser Chiefs (choose your era), interspersed with TV-theme melodies for trumpet and violin; and …A Cultural Clash closes with distinctly abstract ambience.

Unusual, genre-defying, quirky… but certainly both fascinating and listenable.

Released on 10 April 2017, Identity is available as a digital album from Bandcamp, CD BabyAmazon and iTunes.

 

Patrick Lester-Rourke audio engineer, composer
Josh Schofield alto saxophone
Ning-Ning Li violin
Alex Astbury trumpet
Alex Roche acoustic guitar
Matthew Price electric guitar
Oliver Law electric guitar
Tom Harris grand piano
David Ferris organ
Vittorio Mura bass clarinet
Ben Weatherill bass synth
Aram Bahmaie double bass
Gwilym Jones drums

plester-rourke.co.uk

PL-RP001 (2017)

‘Caipi’ – Kurt Rosenwinkel

caipi

PHILADELPHIA-BORN, Berlin-resident jazz guitarist/keyboardist Kurt Rosenwinkel’s career is especially associated with influential artists such as Gary Burton, Paul Motion, Brad Mehldau and Chris Potter. So the sunshiny, vocal emphasis of his new release Caipi comes as something of a surprise. Yet it’s a surprise which prompts fascination, increasing endearment and positivity. 

Rosenwinkel suggests that it’s taken a decade to make this album a reality – and whilst it’s very much a solo album (the composer playing guitars, bass, piano, synth and drums throughout, and also occasionally taking lead vocal), he also welcomes a number of guests to provide a panoply of textures, including appearances from saxophonist Mark Turner and vocalist/lyricist Amanda Brecker. There’s even a subtle cameo from Eric Clapton, who describes Rosenwinkel as “a genius – he really is”; and the album’s decidedly effervescent South American flavours (‘Caipirinha’ being a Brazilian/Portuguese cocktail) are enhanced by the intriguing vocal timbres of young Brazilian singer/instrumentalist Pedro Martins.

This full hour’s eleven-track diversity might initially be perplexing, especially for fans of the guitarist’s instrumental-jazz back catalogue. But it doesn’t take long to warm to the naive frailty of Pedro Martins’ gentle voice; and though Rosenwinkel’s straight vocal delivery may be reminiscent of ’70s prog instrumentalists who came from behind the frontman’s shadows to sing for their own solo projects, it’s these constantly fluctuating points of difference, plus a tangible homely quality, which attracts. The background to this bold, intentional move is explained thus: “Writing songs with lyrics has always been very much a part of musical world, but they’ve usually stayed in my private sphere. With Caipi, I realised that these were also lyric songs and that ultimately I would sing them as well. It’s definitely something different from my other albums, but it’s a familiar place for me and it was just a matter of doing what the music needed”.

A sultry bossa nova influence is there from the opening of the title track, its wordless backing vocals and flute-voiced synth redolent of Pat Metheny or The Isley Brothers, with Rosenwinkel’s electric guitar improv reaching up to an azure sky; and Martins’ tremulant falsetto sails across the gently bass-driven gossamer-sustained layers of Kama. The contrasting pop chirpiness of Casio Vanguard and Summer Song quirkily recall the pop-jingle of ’80s band Johnny Hates Jazz, though brimming with invention and detail, whilst Methenyesque Chromatic B‘s babbling electric bass underpins its Latin piano-and-guitar pulse. Shadows-style riffs support Rosenwinkel’s affirming vocal in purposeful Hold On (“…and you know we’re not alone”); and the folksy tenderness of Ezra, dedicated to his youngest son, is similarly uplifting (“live each day with joy and laughter”) as Mark Turner’s tenor sax extemporises broadly over a mid-rock groove.

By now, it’s possible you’ll be hooked… only to discover Rosenwinkel still has four more appealing numbers to deliver – Little Dream and Casio Escher (both embellished by Amanda Brecker’s vocal dexterity), bossa shuffler Interspace and anthemically-closing Little B. An album which is both curious and distinctive, it leaves a beautiful impression of radiance and hope, and is described by its creator as “angels working for the light”.

Released in UK/Europe on 10 February 2017, and in the US on 30 March 2017, Caipi is available from Heartcore Records as well as iTunes, Amazon, etc.

 

Kurt Rosenwinkel acoustic guitar, nylon guitar, electric guitar, bass, piano, drums, percussion, synth, Casio, voice
with
Pedro Martins voice, synth, harmonium, drums, floor tom
and guests
Frederika Krier violin
Andi Haberl drums
Antonio Loureiro voice
Alex Kozmidi baritone guitar
Kyra Garéy voice
Mark Turner tenor sax
Amanda Brecker voice
Eric Clapton guitar
Zola Mennenöh voice
Chris Komer French horn

kurtrosenwinkel.com

RazDaz Recordz / Heartcore Records – RD4618 (2016)

‘Pasar Klewer’ – Dwiki Dharmawan (2CD)

dwikidharmawan

THE SCALE AND DYNAMISM of double album Pasar Klewer, from Indonesian pianist Dwiki Dharmawan, is pretty awe-inspiring. 

Reflecting the hustle and bustle of its South-East Asian marketplace title (and reinforced by a lively cover illustration), this ambitious, one-hundred-minute fusion of jazz, rock and world music has at its core a vibrant trio, with Dharmawan joined by the brilliance of bassist Yaron Stavi and drummer/percussionist Asaf Sirkis. But the beautiful eclecticism of contributions made by the pianist’s guest musicians – including clarinettist/saxophonist Gilad Atzmon and electric guitarist Mark Wingfield – elevates these eleven, expansive tracks into a cornucopia of often unexpected riches.

Described as a cultural icon in his homeland, performer, composer and arranger Dharmawan’s expertise in bringing together these various strands is impressive; and with a breathlessly flamboyant piano technique, he is clearly an inspirational leader. Title track Pasar Klewer brims with exotic colour, Mark Wingfield’s characteristic, high-velocity guitar the ideal partner for the busyness of Dharmawan, Stavi and Sirkis; yet it is also imbued with the magical sound-imagery of chants, bells and Aris Daryono’s three-stringed rebab. Glad Atzmon’s clarinet deftness (always with such a distinctly ‘vocal’ expression) soars in Spirit of Peace, a relentless, smouldering dance suffused with Nicolas Meier’s glissentar improvisations and Asaf Sirkis’ konakol voicings.

It’s an adventure of mystery and discovery, with the sense of pulling back the curtain to reveal the next chapter – so Atzmon’s superb soprano sax outpourings over vigorous gamelan orchestra and free-jazz piano trio are just a small part of the story of thirteen-minute Tjampuhan; melodically uplifting Frog Dance (with a field recording of the Balinese variety) is irresistible; and Asaf Sirkis’ own Life It Self enjoys a hard-driven prog groove perpetuated by the heavier aspect of his drumming and the stratospheric, pitch-bent guitar of Mark Wingfield.

Robert Wyatt’s Forest and the trio’s composition London in June include the theatrical vocals of Boris Savoldelli; and Dharmawan’s arrangement of traditional tune Lir Ilir is introduced by the decorative voice of Peni Candra Rini before it cranks up into full-throttle piano jazz embellished by glissentar. Amidst such intensity, moments of repose can be found in elegant Bubuyu Bulan and Purnama, whilst the expanded, instrumental version of Forest which closes the programme – featuring both Dharmawan and Wingfield, effectively enhanced by electronic shooting stars – possesses a transcendental magic.

Bask in its cosmopolitan outlook and astounding musicianship.

Further details and audio samples at MoonJune Records.

 

Dwiki Dharmawan acoustic piano
Yaron Stavi upright bass, electric bass
Asaf Sirkis drums, udu clay percussion, shaker, konakol singing
with
Mark Wingfield guitar
Nicolas Meier glissentar, acoustic guitar
Gilad Atzmon clarinet, soprano sax
Boris Savoldelli vocals
Ari Daryono vocals, gamelan percussion, kendang percussion, rebab
Peni Candra Rini vocals
Gamelan Jess Jegog led by I Nyoman Windha gamelan orchestra

dwikidharmawan.net

MoonJune Records – MJR081 (2016)

‘The Lightning Bell’ – Beresford Hammond Hume

BeresfordHammondHume

THE IMPROVISATORY MUSIC of guitarist/pianist Charlie Beresford and cellist Sonia Hammond, in 2014 album The Science of Snow, came as something of a revelation. Arising quite simply from a cancelled studio booking, the duo proceeded to use the time to create an enticing, spontaneous sequence of artistic impressions which had the ability to conjure visual imagery in a spacial and often affecting way.

For new release The Lightning Bell, Beresford and Hammond collaborate with classical, prog rock and improv pianist Carolyn Hume; and singer Judie Tzuke guests on two tracks, complementing Charlie Beresford’s own vocal contributions (Tzuke’s 1979 chart hit Stay With Me Till Dawn remains a spine tingler). Once again, this is original music which somehow transports mind and soul to another place, where the freedoms of improvisation are able to connect with the emotions so surprisingly. On the surface, these abstract soundscapes could be perceived as dark, sombre spaces – yet beneath lies bohemian beauty resulting from a meeting of creative spirits at one moment in time. The title is derived from an 18th Century device which demonstrated, albeit simply, the conversion of an electrical charge into mechanical energy – the movement of a clapper between two oppositely-charged bells to create sound.

The introduction of improvised, sung phrases into some of this album’s eight, expansive tracks brings a further instrumental dimension, rather than apparent, specific meaning. Beresford’s utterances in slowly drifting opener Call the Time add to a sultriness vaguely redolent of Gershwin’s Summertime, as he whispers across sustained cello, diminished piano elaborations and abstract guitar; and the addition of Judie Tzuke’s recognisable, mellow tones in Then the Cloud Comes contribute to a vivid, overcast landscape, with Hammond’s cello scratching the sky and Beresford’s persistent, wiry guitar tremblings accentuating Hume’s rainy piano.

As with the first release, the music here is often on a filmic scale – Feather War Cast’s openness and unpredictability, across almost ten minutes, allows the imagination to run free; a combination of melodic, pitch-bent guitar extemporisations across sustained, English contemporary classical piano and cello, interspersed with extraneous knocks and scrapes. The Heavy Branch is particularly indicative of deep bell clangs and chimes as Hammond’s sinuous cello harmonics meld effectively with Beresford’s clever, echoic guitar purrs – and Carolyn Hume’s Debussyian piano depth (à la The Sunken Cathedral) emphasises its humidity.

Fascinating, if a little disturbing, Laid Bare‘s darting guitar glissandi and slippery, whistling harmonic cello become clothed in delicate, skylit piano; and pastoral, melancholic As If All Was Within, with subtly chattering guitar strings on frets, is ornamented by the soft, folky words of Charlie Beresford. Judie Tzuke’s vocals provide In the Dark Hours with a more songlike feel, though its references to insomnia and nightmare bring a chill to the sparse instrumental weave; and The Last Port concludes – perhaps the darkest, most menacing film-score episode of the entire album.

These are deep expressions, yet the imagery and emotion triggered by the sincerity of such artistic improvisation can make this a compelling experience. Take a listen – video: Call the Time.

Released on 12 June 2016, The Lightning Bell is available from the52ndshop and Amazon.

 

Charlie Beresford acoustic guitar, voice
Sonia Hammond cello
Carolyn Hume piano
with
Judie Tzuke voice (tracks 3, 7)

Sleeve images: Gaëna da Sylva.

the52nd.com

the52nd – 52NDCD002 (2016)

‘Snowpoet’ – Snowpoet

Snowpoet

IN A WORLD where, like some time-lapse street scene, we are frequently bombarded by high-energy grooves and cacophonous soundbites, Snowpoet have an adroit ability to create, through arresting vocal melodies/utterances and unexpected instrumental timbres, a gossamer labyrinth of intrigue and enchantment in which to lose ourselves.

The mesmerising vocals of Lauren Kinsella, fronting these nine tracks, are sensitively woven into the band’s ebbing and flowing sonic spaces – and the effect, particularly when heard in quiet isolation, has a remarkable impact on the senses. Kinsella – who sees her voice primarily as an instrument – places an emphasis on syllabic deconstruction, as well as rhythmic and tonal modulation (reminiscent of Annette Peacock), explaining that “sound comes through the word and has a musical meaning all of its own, regardless of its linguistic understanding.” That approach, central to this album’s creative folk/ambience, can be inexplicably and emotionally moving. Comprising a personnel (see below) who, individually, perform across a variety of genres (including contemporary jazz), these soundscapes are mixed by Chris Hyson and Alex Killpartrick; and the musical environments they produce require a certain abandonment from the listener.

Vivid, sun-glinted rivulets are depicted in Mermaid, a beautifully accessible introduction teeming with instrumental/electronic life and dreamy, layered vocals; and the whispered usherings of In a Quiet Space lead to Kinsella’s characteristic, undulating voice, the sense of anticipation painted by luscious clusters of sound suggesting a magical discovery under a forest canopy. Glad To Have Lost is redolent of one of Kinsella’s other projects, Blue Eyed Hawk, in the way its prog-style guitar and electronics underpin her typically measured lines before melting into piano-teared ambience; and the Irish lilt of Laura Kinsella’s poetic, melodic speech here is so compelling.

Creaking, tuned-out piano accompanies the vocal line in live-feel If I Miss a Star (an effect which recalls the quaintness of Peter Gabriel’s Me and My Teddy Bear), and countryfied Little Moon Man, with its acoustic guitar momentum, is utterly charming, delicately swathed in wordless backing vocals and ’70s-style synth riffs. The band’s acuity with audio imagery is continued in Gathering, as floating patterns, clicky extraneous sounds and broken, sustained electronics head downstream; and Kinsella’s playful dialogue in Waves is fused with 12-string guitar and plush vocal textures which later hit crashing breakers. Poetry of Stillness suggests an echoic, Peter Pan world of heavenly imagination with lengthened, storytelling vocalisations (“together, we walked up into a clou-u-ud of dreams”); and extended, rising Eviternity closes with a tingling sense of hope.

Especially in late-night solitude, this is a go-to album for immersive escapism – and that can be engendered in so many ways, be it disturbing, becalming or joyfully life-affirming. It takes deep, musical sincerity to achieve such powerful therapy; and for this reason, Snowpoet’s debut recording remains an outstanding body of work.

Released on Two Rivers Records, Snowpoet can be purchased in CD and digital download formats at Bandcamp.

 

Lauren Kinsella vocals, lyrics
Chris Hyson electric bass, keyboards, synths, piano, acoustic guitar, Wurlitzer
Matthew Robinson piano, keyboards, synths
Nicholas Costley-White acoustic and electric guitars
Josh Arcoleo backing vocals, synths, tenor saxophone
Dave Hamblett drums
with
Lloyd Haines additional drums (Little Moon Man, Poetry of Stillness)
Alex Killpartrick additional synth (Little Moon Man)

snowpoet.co.uk

Two Rivers Records – TRR 007

‘Dreamland Mechanism’ – Beledo

Beledo

POWERING his way into the typically resolute MoonJune galaxy of contemporary jazz/rock recordings, US electric guitarist, multi-instrumentalist and composer Beledo releases Dreamland Mechanism – an impressively energised and virtuosic solo debut.

Something of a late-teen guitar hero in his native Uruguay, as well as neighbouring Argentina, Beledo moved to New York at the beginning of the 1990s – and his professional career has continued to flourish there, working with a panoply of big-name artists including Jimmy Haslip, Jeff Berlin, Randy Brecker and Gilad Atzmon. Now, for this dynamic solo project, he calls on a clutch of his associates – chiefly electric bassist Lincoln Goines and drummer Gary Husband, with contributions from Tony Steele, Doron Lev, Endang Ramdan, Cucu Kurnia, Dewa Budjana and Rudy Zulkarnaen.

Beledo’s experience of the changing face of jazz/rock fusion over the past few decades, and presumably an understanding of its ’60s/’70s roots, appear to be significant in the realisation of his compositions and these band performances – opener Mechanism, with Jerry Goodman-style violin flamboyance, summons the spirit of Mahavishnu; and reedy synth extemporisations alongside Lincoln Goine’s prominent, aqueous, electric bass in Marilyn’s Escapade easily echo the vibrancy of Zawinul and Pastorius. In an album of contrasts, such sunshiny, multi-coloured grooves are balanced with guitar rock-outs Bye Bye Blues and Big Brother Calling, their wailing synth/moog lines and soaring, echoic guitar solos perhaps recalling early ’80s Jeff Beck; and the strong, articulate drums and percussion of Gary Husband are particularly evident in these higher-octane outings, Mercury in Retrograde‘s guitar/bass/drum simplicity actually filling the room with effective, dramatic saturation.

Combining dual kendang and other percussion with Beledo’s acoustic guitar, Lucila produces an exotic, cross-cultural blend of Brazilian, Javanese and Flamenco influences – and tempered by richly lyrical electric guitar and fretless bass improvisations, this becomes a fascinatingly fluent, polyrhythmic journey. First impressions might indicate ‘an album style’, but closer investigations draw out the breadth of composition and instrumental colour across these fifty-six minutes, Silent Assessment rolling solidly to its deep bass undulations and attractive guitar riffs, as well as chiming, sweeping synths reminiscent of Dave Stewart (National Health, Bruford); and the perky, complex rhythms of Sudden Voyage are irresistible, Husband playing out of his skin(s).

Indonesian guitar star Dewa Budjana appears on sumptuous BuDJanaji – presumably a direct dedication, it’s characterised by Beledo’s shared, Lyle Mays-style vocal/guitar lines and his guest’s fine, Allan Holdsworth-like wide tremolo improvisations (both Budjana and Holdsworth are MoonJune artists). And Front Porch Pine is the perfect closer to this extravaganza – Beledo’s superb guitar electronics and speedy runs almost vying for dominance with Tony Steele’s mobile electric bass oscillations and Doron Lev’s relentless drums/percussion.

If you’re looking for good-time, well-produced, high-energy jazz/rock with especially piquant detail…… Dreamland Mechanism is available from the MoonJune Records website, as well as BandcampAmazon, etc.

 

Beledo
electric guitar
acoustic guitar (tracks 4, 8)
violin (track 1)
Fender Rhodes (track 1)
Mini Moog (track 2)
acoustic piano (track 3)
accordion (track 3)
fretless bass (track 4)
vocals (track 8)

Lincoln Goines electric bass (tracks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7)
Gary Husband drums (tracks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7)
Tony Steele electric bass (tracks 9, 10)
Doron Lev drums (tracks 9, 10), percussion (track 9)
Endang Ramdan lead kendang percussion (tracks 4, 8)
Cucu Kurnia kendang percussion (tracks 4, 8)
Dewa Budjana electric guitar (track 8)
Rudy Zulkarnaen electric bass (track 8)

beledo.com

MoonJune Records – MJR077 (2016)

‘Parachute’ – Magnus Öström

Parachute

OVERCOMING darkness with light, both personally and in a global context, appears central to Parachute, the third solo album from a musician synonymous with groundbreaking contemporary jazz/rock – drummer and composer Magnus Öström.

For a decade and a half, Öström was a perfect third of seminal trio e.s.t. (with pianist Esbjörn Svensson and bassist Dan Berglund), until Svensson’s shocking, untimely death in 2008.

Now, with his established personnel of Andreas Hourdakis (guitars), Thobias Gabrielson (bass, keyboards) and Daniel Karlsson (piano, keyboards) – following on from solo debut Thread of Life (2011) and Searching for Jupiter (2013) – this new release exhibits a more celebratory, cathartic approach. Öström specifically identifies his personal ‘parachute’ as the healing energy of music, especially amidst the darkest of times; and the pervading, sometimes slow-burning intent of these eight original tracks does indeed possess an aura of positivity, acceptance and contentment.

It’s a sound world which might take some time to break into – opener Dog on the Beach‘s blue-sky propulsion ripples ebulliently to guitar and keyboard riffs, whereas Walkabout Bug‘s ticking, oscillating pop gait is as much about the groove as its synth-supported improvisations. But at its heart is the unmistakable exactitude of Öström’s drumming, his characteristic attention to detail producing a signature sound familiar to any e.s.t. fan. Junas is a classic example, with its prog rock piano/keyboard drama and jazz guitar chromatics dancing to the drummer’s syncopated, shuffling, perpetual motion and typically glinting percussion.

The barren, opening theme of The Green Man and the French Horn gives way to calm abandonment, its blithe piano and guitar demeanour suggesting a folksy, hymn-like solace; and excitingly propulsive title track Parachute figuratively suggests Öström’s “way back to life” via zesty synth passages and a pianistically jazz-inflected middle section, as well as vividly pictorialising an adrenalin-fired, flare-trailed descent to terra firma.

The Shore of Unsure is animated through Öström’s compelling, palpitating drive – a dark, cinematic episode enhanced by guest trumpeter Mathias Eick’s clear, transcendent extemporisations, whilst Reedjoyce‘s pop/rock fervour reveals, more than ever, the full-on, blistering potential of this line-up; and a cool-grooving breeziness in closing track All the Remaining Days is coloured by balmy guitar-and-piano motifs.

Magnus Öström says that he had always intended this project to create at least three albums, to see how it developed – and there’s a sense of both consolidation and progress throughout these fifty minutes. As an artist, he has already provided us with an incalculably rich legacy, through e.s.t. – and with these solo realisations, as well as the new ‘e.s.t. Symphony’ project, his creative journey continues to be fascinating to follow.

Released on 1 April 2016, Parachute is available from Amazon, iTunes, etc. (album trailer here).

 

Magnus Öström drums, percussion, voice
Andreas Hourdakis electric guitar, acoustic guitar
Thobias Gabrielson bass, bass synthesizer, keyboards
Daniel Karlsson grand piano, keyboards
with
Mathias Eick trumpet (on The Shore of Unsure)

magnusostrom.com

Diesel Music – DIESEL C-54 (2016)