‘All In’ – Beats & Pieces Big Band

AllIn

TALK ABOUT Northern soul – these guys have it in three-storey-with-a-mezzanine-shed-loads!

Beats & Pieces Big Band have come a long way in seven years. From their tentative beginnings as Manchester students, through to their early EP and local gigs at Band on the Wall and the Royal Northern College of Music, they have developed a keen following which, on the basis of last year’s blazing Manchester Jazz Festival appearance, is swiftly on the rise. Their excellent 2012 debut album, Big Ideas, turned more than jazz heads, brought Jazz FM and Parliamentary awards, and prompted invitations to perform internationally.

Directed by enthusiastic composer, arranger and instrumentalist Ben Cottrell, and drawing big band comparisons such as Loose Tubes and Matthew Herbert (due to their infectious energy, use of electronics and an unorthodox, contemporary approach), 14-strong Beats & Pieces now release their much-anticipated follow-up, All In – a bristling statement of their current stature. Three powerful banks of three (saxes, trumpets and trombones) are completed by guitar, piano/Rhodes, bass and drums; and buried amongst the irrepressibly slick grooves, their quite-likely uniqueness is characterised by the occasional, endearing whiff of no-nonsense Lancashire colliery band (confirmed by the album’s tailpiece).

Collective influences include Gil Evans, Quincy Jones, Radiohead and Björk… so the resultant six originals and one interpretation (recorded essentially live in the studio) are both dynamic and even entertainingly perplexing. Opener Rocky blasts its way through the first three minutes with all the gritty verve of an extreme, full-throttle movie car chase – raucous and wayward, yet somehow together. Pop hits a relentless, rapid, ‘Can’t Hurry Love’ groove, with Nick Walters’ chattering muted trumpet and Anton Hunter’s guitar riding the swelling, crashing then ebbing wall of horns, whilst Patrick Hurley’s ostinato Rhodes impression of Rain is particularly effective, underpinning tight, reverbed, brassy arrangements before soloing freely.

Ten-minute expanse Havmann (‘the man from the sea’, inspired by Antony Gormley’s statue installation in Mo í Rana, Northern Norway) feels like a new departure; its piercing, semitonal, synth rise-and-fall seems redolent of early Genesis or Robert Fripp, with the icy, spiky urgency of the overlapping extemporisations perhaps echoing the Scandinavian fjords experienced by Cottrell. Originally composed for and workshopped by Norwegian band Ensemble Denada, its impressive slowly-building intensity glints to Graham South’s echoic flugel horn and cinemascope unison trumpets.

Hendo is classic B & P – all solid bass drum, swirling baseline, impudent wah-wah guitar, crescendoing blasts and Sam Healey’s typically flamboyant soprano sax. Revealed a few years ago at an RNCM gig, Ben Cottrell’s sultry New York-style reading of David Bowie’s Let’s Dance finds its place here. A great example of the director’s prowess with arrangements of the unexpected, its lazy demeanour erupts into funky Average White Band euphoria, complete with cheeky, rising James Taylor (Starsky & Hutch) quotation courtesy of Sam Healey’s alto. And so to close, the aforementioned miniature of misty, brass band nostalgia, Fairytale – so beautiful in hymn-like simplicity.

Long may this forward-thinking band continue! All In is released on 8 June 2015, by Efpi Records, and is available here. The album officially launches at Soup Kitchen, Manchester, on 7 July 2015, and at Ronnie Scott’s the following evening.

 

Ben Cottrell director
Anthony Brown, Sam Healey, Ben Watte saxophones
Owen Bryce, Graham South, Nick Walters trumpet
Ed Horsey, Simon Lodge, Rich McVeigh trombone
Anton Hunter guitar
Patrick Hurley piano, Rhodes
Harrison Wood bass
Finlay Panter drums

beatsnpieces.net

Efpi Records – FP022 (2015)

‘Anton Hunter Trio’ – Anton Hunter Trio

AntonHunter

EFPI RECORDS is one of those indie jazz labels whose fairly recent trajectory is fascinating to follow. With the hugely popular Beats & Pieces Big Band arguably their flagship act, the Manchester-based organisation is carving out a niche, and an audience, for emerging musicians who are keen to forge their own distinctive – and frequently experimental – musical explorations, the emphasis being on artistic innovation (which their album art, often handmade, reflects).

Co-founder of Efpi (as well as member of Beats & Pieces and numerous other ensembles) is guitarist Anton Hunter who, here, fronts his own trio with a particularly distinctive, frequently minimal, improvisatory guitar and compositional style. Given the spacial worlds created, the five tracks of this eponymous release might easily evoke landscapes – and closer inspection of the band’s mutual extemporisations is both intriguing and rewarding. Joining Anton are James Adolpho (bass) and brother, Johnny Hunter (drums).

Tentatively-seeking in nature, opening number Kolme finds Anton demonstrating the delicacy of his guitar approach with his melodic and chordal weave – drums and bass similarly sparse – before crescendoing into an impressively purposeful, saturated soundwash. Aire, a 13-minute voyage, engages from the start, with appealing repeated vanishing droplets of guitar colour. Picking up rhythmic momentum, bass and drums breathe life into (its title may indicate) a tumbling, fast-flowing river, shimmering cymbals and sustained overlapping guitar textures furthering this notion (beautiful musical imagery indeed).

Snare-led Newsome is curious and melancholy, as well as being melodically open, suggesting both freedom and interaction between the three. In contrast, TRSQ enters Robert Fripp territory… a gloriously potent mix of grungy distorted guitar, boisterous percussion and constant deep bass rumble – entrancing stuff indeed for this listener and clearly deeply satisfying for the trio! Finally, Tyven finds open ground once more, drums and bass exploring sparkily together as Anton’s guitar rises above with an almost out-of-body calm.

With this release, the Anton Hunter Trio are marking the way for others brave enough to follow – and the creative spirit of Efpi is much to be admired for its services to boundary-pushing jazz and (as they describe it) ‘jazz-ish’ music. Long may it continue!

For further information on this and other Efpi albums, and to purchase, visit efpirecords.com.


Anton Hunter
 guitar, effects
James Adolpho double bass
Johnny Hunter drums

Efpi Records – FP011 (2013)