#recentlistening – October 2019 (2 of 2)

Sirkis/Bialas IQ – Our New Earth (2CD)
Asaf Sirkis, Sylwia Bialas, Frank Harrison, Kevin Glasgow
Release date: 2 October 2019 (MoonJune Records)
asafsirkis-moonjune.bandcamp.com/album/our-new-earth-hd

The Bad Plus – Activate Infinity
Reid Anderson, Orrin Evans, Dave King
Release date: 25 October 2019 (Edition Records)
thebadplus.bandcamp.com/album/activate-infinity

Bill Laurance & WDR Big Band – Live at the Philharmonie Cologne
Bill Laurance, WDR Big Band conducted by Bob Mintzer
Release date: 8 November 2019 (Jazzline)
propermusic.com/catalog/product/view/id/95057/s/d77074-live-at-the-philharmonie-cologne/

Blicher Hemmer Gadd – Get That Motor Runnin’
Michael Blicher, Dan Hemmer, Steve Gadd with guest Paul Carrack
Release date: 1 November 2019 (C-Nut Records)
michaelblicher.bandcamp.com/album/get-that-motor-runnin

Alison Rayner Quintet (ARQ) – Short Stories
Steve Lodder, Deirdre Cartwright, Alison Rayner, Buster Birch, Diane McLoughlin
Release date: 25 October 2019 (Blow the Fuse Music)
alisonrayner.com/albums/short-stories/

Jim Beard / Jon Herington – Chunks and Chairknobs
Jim Beard, Jon Herington
Release date: 15 November 2019 (Jazzline)
propermusic.com/catalog/product/view/id/95063/s/d77069-chunks-chairknobs/category/61846/

#recentlistening – September 2019 (2 of 3)

Saxophone Summit – Street Talk
Dave Liebman, Joe Lovano, Greg Osby, Billy Hart, Phil Markowitz, Cecil McBee
Release date: 4 October 2019 (Enja Records)
propermusic.com/catalog/product/view/id/93844/s/enja97692-saxophone-summit-street-talk/

Mike De Souza – Slowburn
Mike De Souza, Huw V Williams, Jay Davis
Release date: 17 October 2019
mikedesouzatrio.bandcamp.com/album/slow-burn

Crosscurrents Trio – Good Hope
Dave Holland, Zakir Hussain, Chris Potter
Release date: 11 October 2019 (Edition Records)
crosscurrentstrio.bandcamp.com/album/good-hope

Abdullah Ibrahim – Dream Time
Abullah Ibrahim – solo piano
Release date: 27 September (Enja Records)
*awaiting new link

Sue Rynhart, featuring Huw Warren – We Are on Time (Flower Seeds) (single)
Sue Rynhart, Huw Warren
Release date: 23 June 2019
suerynhart.comApple Music / Amazon

Natacha Atlas – Strange Days
Natacha Atlas, Samy Bishai, Hayden Powell, Robinson Khoury, Alcyona Mick, Andy Hamill, Asaf Sirkis, Laurie Lowe + guests
Release date: 4 October 2019 (Whirlwind Recordings)
natachaatlas1.bandcamp.com/album/strange-days

‘Pasar Klewer’ – Dwiki Dharmawan (2CD)

dwikidharmawan

THE SCALE AND DYNAMISM of double album Pasar Klewer, from Indonesian pianist Dwiki Dharmawan, is pretty awe-inspiring. 

Reflecting the hustle and bustle of its South-East Asian marketplace title (and reinforced by a lively cover illustration), this ambitious, one-hundred-minute fusion of jazz, rock and world music has at its core a vibrant trio, with Dharmawan joined by the brilliance of bassist Yaron Stavi and drummer/percussionist Asaf Sirkis. But the beautiful eclecticism of contributions made by the pianist’s guest musicians – including clarinettist/saxophonist Gilad Atzmon and electric guitarist Mark Wingfield – elevates these eleven, expansive tracks into a cornucopia of often unexpected riches.

Described as a cultural icon in his homeland, performer, composer and arranger Dharmawan’s expertise in bringing together these various strands is impressive; and with a breathlessly flamboyant piano technique, he is clearly an inspirational leader. Title track Pasar Klewer brims with exotic colour, Mark Wingfield’s characteristic, high-velocity guitar the ideal partner for the busyness of Dharmawan, Stavi and Sirkis; yet it is also imbued with the magical sound-imagery of chants, bells and Aris Daryono’s three-stringed rebab. Glad Atzmon’s clarinet deftness (always with such a distinctly ‘vocal’ expression) soars in Spirit of Peace, a relentless, smouldering dance suffused with Nicolas Meier’s glissentar improvisations and Asaf Sirkis’ konakol voicings.

It’s an adventure of mystery and discovery, with the sense of pulling back the curtain to reveal the next chapter – so Atzmon’s superb soprano sax outpourings over vigorous gamelan orchestra and free-jazz piano trio are just a small part of the story of thirteen-minute Tjampuhan; melodically uplifting Frog Dance (with a field recording of the Balinese variety) is irresistible; and Asaf Sirkis’ own Life It Self enjoys a hard-driven prog groove perpetuated by the heavier aspect of his drumming and the stratospheric, pitch-bent guitar of Mark Wingfield.

Robert Wyatt’s Forest and the trio’s composition London in June include the theatrical vocals of Boris Savoldelli; and Dharmawan’s arrangement of traditional tune Lir Ilir is introduced by the decorative voice of Peni Candra Rini before it cranks up into full-throttle piano jazz embellished by glissentar. Amidst such intensity, moments of repose can be found in elegant Bubuyu Bulan and Purnama, whilst the expanded, instrumental version of Forest which closes the programme – featuring both Dharmawan and Wingfield, effectively enhanced by electronic shooting stars – possesses a transcendental magic.

Bask in its cosmopolitan outlook and astounding musicianship.

Further details and audio samples at MoonJune Records.

 

Dwiki Dharmawan acoustic piano
Yaron Stavi upright bass, electric bass
Asaf Sirkis drums, udu clay percussion, shaker, konakol singing
with
Mark Wingfield guitar
Nicolas Meier glissentar, acoustic guitar
Gilad Atzmon clarinet, soprano sax
Boris Savoldelli vocals
Ari Daryono vocals, gamelan percussion, kendang percussion, rebab
Peni Candra Rini vocals
Gamelan Jess Jegog led by I Nyoman Windha gamelan orchestra

dwikidharmawan.net

MoonJune Records – MJR081 (2016)

‘ONE’ – Tim Garland

ONE

THE PROSPECT of a new Tim Garland album always raises the pulse… and unquestionably, ONE is no exception.

The saxophonist/composer has, through time and experience, become a treasured mainstay of the UK jazz scene – and his releases of the last couple of years (2014’s Songs to the North Sky and last year’s Return to the Fire) have certainly confirmed that status. The final track of the 2015 album – a recording which rekindled, on vinyl, the acoustic excitement of 1995’s Enter the Fire – featured both longtime collaborator Jason Rebello on Fender Rhodes and versatile guitarist Ant Law in a more electronic groove, presumably sparking the notion of a future project in similar vein.

Well, here it is, in all its splendid jazz-rock magnificence, completing the quartet with Asaf Sirkis (from Lighthouse Trio days) on drums and percussion, plus guests Hossam Ramzy (percussion) and Dionne Bennett (vocals). It’s a thriller of a masterpiece, pretty much from start to finish, with Tim Garland’s instantly-recognisable vibrato and commanding presence heading up a wondrous complexity of textural arrangements, sparkling rhythms and fabulous virtuosity. Garland was, notably, a key player in legendary prog rock and jazz drummer Bill Bruford’s Earthworks line-ups, and the influence of that sound world is frequently apparent in many of these nine original compositions. Indeed, a similar level of detail certainly keeps this album on loud ‘repeat’ in the car CD player (no track-jumping here!) – a recording which adroitly achieves a perfect synthesis of slick production and spontaneous, improvisatory performance.

Garland and colleagues ‘roadworked’ this material, whilst touring, to both hone and co-own the interpretations which made the final recording. Such acquired confidence is evident from the off, in Sama’i for Peace whose energetic and tricksy ten-beat pulse fuses Sirkis’ Middle Eastern colours, emphasised by Hossam Ramzy’s added percussion, with Genesis-like electronic keyboard and guitar sustenance; and Garland’s soprano exuberance seems to hit new heights. Bright New Year must be one of the most optimistic, blue-sky compositions heard in some time, its shimmering, folksy guitar and piano supporting Garland’s memorable, soaring melodies (Ant Law’s 12-string acoustic adding hard-edged urgency); and the burning drama of The Eternal Greeting demands focus as Garland’s deep tenor richness pirouettes with the gradually building instrumental weave.

Colours of Night ripples with Garland’s signature compositional riffs, echoing his jazz-fusion association with Chick Corea – and the depth of chordal Rhodes and guitar palettes ensure that this quartet always remains strong, without the need for a bassist. Here, Ant Law’s high electric guitar improvisations are both incisive and dextrous, whilst Zawinulesque keyboards and Sirkis’ remarkable konnakol voice send shivers up the spine – this is a band which continually seeks out new combinations to impressive effect. Prototype hits the King Crimson and Yes buttons with vigour, its flawless, percussive synchronisation and Law’s searing guitar recalling that first rush of hearing Robert Fripp or Steve Howe; and Gathering Dark‘s smouldering Mediterranean journey, featuring Jason Rebello’s typical elegant piano improvisation, is full of mercurial interest.

Dionne Bennett’s smoky and earnest vocal adds weight to Garland’s lyrics in Pity the Poor Arms Dealer – a passionate protest song against arms profiteering (though amidst the album’s predominant, instrumental feel-good, it could seem a little incongruous). Foretold is reminiscent of Garland’s excellent Libra album, his multi-layered tenor combining with synthy washes and both Sirkis’ and Ramzy’s percussive elaborations; and to close, Youkay fizzes with the most delicious Weather Reportian fervour – quite possibly the album standout.

Succinctly… it’s difficult to recommend this album too highly.

Released on Edition Records, ONE is available as CD and high-quality download at Bandcamp.

 

Tim Garland soprano and tenor saxophones, additional keyboards and percussion
Asaf Sirkis drums, percussion, konnakol
Jason Rebello piano, Fender Rhodes, Hammond B3 organ, keyboards
Ant Law nylon string, 12 string, 8 string and semi-acoustic guitars
with guests
Hossam Ramzy doholla, Egyptian tabla, karkabu (tracks 1, 4 and 8)
Dionne Bennett vocals (track 7)

timgarland.com

Edition Records – EDN1072 (2016)

‘A Journey’ – Maciek Pysz

Maciek-Pysz-A-Journey-Cover-Art-Final-Production

A TRAVELOGUE of refined chamber jazz, acoustic guitarist Maciek Pysz’s new release A Journey meanders, eddies and dances afresh to European jazz and world/folk atmospheres.

Read the full review at LondonJazz News…

 

Maciek Pysz acoustic and classical guitars
Yuri Goloubev double bass (and piano on Always on the Move)
Asaf Sirkis drums and percussion
Daniele di Bonaventura bandoneon, piano

maciekpysz.com

Dot Time Records – DT9044 (2015)

‘Proof of Light’ – Mark Wingfield

Proof

IMAGINE the late ’70s progressive jazz/rock boom of Jeff Beck, John McLaughlin and AllanHoldsworth, and you might be somewhere on the right track to the music of Anglo-American electric guitarist Mark Wingfield. Yet here is a musician who has honed his own, specific approach to the instrument and, consequently, his original, heavy-duty compositions.

Recording for the first time with New York-based label MoonJune Records, Wingfield has partnered with two stalwarts of the current jazz/rock scene – bassist Yaron Stavi (David Gilmour, Phil Manzanera, Robert Wyatt) and drummer/percussionist Asaf Sirkis (Gilad Atzmon, Jeff Berlin, Tim Garland) – to forge an otherworldly vista of shifting, synthy textures and intense rock-outs. Mark Wingfield’s mercurial guitar technique, frequently at the highest extremity of the fretboard and coaxing extended pitch-bent effects from the tremolo arm, is what defines his signature sound, along with staggering rapidity of improvisation.

Foreboding opener Mars Saffron is instantly redolent of the brilliance of, say, Gary Moore, Jan Hammer or Simon Phillips, as Wingfield’s searing melodies soar over hard-driving electric bass and drums, only pausing briefly amidst synthesised washes. Shadowy Restless Mountains, jangling to metallicised strings, finds Sirkis revelling in its space… at his flamboyant, fire-cracking best; and The Way to Etretat becomes delightfully acoustic as Stavi’s upright bass extemporisations dance around Italian-suggested ambiences, with Wingfield’s later guitar re-entry elevating the whole atmosphere to cinematic soundtrack status (again, Sirkis is irresistibly explosive at the kit).

A mellower, Metheneyesque synth quality to Wingfield’s guitar is found in A Conversation We Had and A Thousand Faces, both offering Wingfield the freedom to elaborate with haunting lyricism. And energized, full-throttle Voltaic resounds to quickfire, rhythmic riffs and gritty, percussive, droned abstractness – echoing Keith Emerson’s roughhouse ELP extravagances, it’s quite a ride!

Summer Night’s Story is an engaging episode of fluctuating colours, Sirkis’ refracting cymbal show especially catching the ear. Koromo’s Tale seems to occupy a cathedral-like vastness, with oriental overtones, as Yaron Stavi’s double bass improvisations set up Wingfield’s own explorations; and title track Proof of Light closes the 54-minute sequence with Sirkis and Stavi supporting Mark Wingfield’s virtuosic, high-wire display before blazing white-hot at its conclusion.

A cursory listen to this album might call for greater variation or augmentation of the trio’s elemental sound – but once immersed in the detail, Proof of Light becomes an intoxicating journey of drama and outstanding technicality.

Further details and audio samples at MoonJune Records.

 

Mark Wingfield electric guitar
Yaron Stavi acoustic and electric bass
Asaf Sirkis drums

markwingfield.com

MoonJune Records (MJR071) – 2015

‘Magna Carta Suite’ – Alex Hutton Trio

AlexHutton

THE CONCEPT of improvisation in Medieval English music seems highly probable as, before the 15th Century, most musicians would have been illiterate. Sharing melodies and words aurally, the likelihood of invention and variation is quite imaginable – and, presumably, a talented, seasoned extemporiser of estampies and danses would have been highly prized.

So, for pianist Alex Hutton, his vision to commemorate this year’s 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta, through a themed jazz suite, is entirely appropriate – especially as his dog-walking routine takes in the ancient woodlands around Runnymede and Wraysbury (near Windsor), where the charter was historically sealed. He recalls his outstanding colleagues from 2012 release Legentis – bassist Yuri Goloubev and drummer Asaf Sirkis – to create a programme of original piano trio music which takes in an English landscape of early music, traditional folk and classical music, with delicate woodwind flecks of baroque flute and cor anglais coruscating through leafy glades.

Alex Hutton’s pictorialisations here can, indeed, be that vivid – his compositions, at times, easily comparable to the soundtracks of small- or big-screen period drama; and there’s even a whiff of Rick Wakeman’s Six Wives in the turbulent, chasing motif of The Barons. The Middle Ages context and sequencing can either be followed or disregarded; but the thematic writing, and the players’ eloquent interpretations of Hutton’s imaginings, are the strong threads which bind this recording together so well.

Old Yew (significantly, under which the Magna Carta was believed to have been signed) opens the album with characteristic sinewy bass from Goloubev, almost as storyteller, leading to the brief, though exquisite, cor anglais melody of King John’s Hunting Lodge. June 15th 1215‘s impish Medieval motif has Hutton’s penny-whistle-suggested high piano frolicking with cor anglais over Sirkis’ hollow percussion (these all feel like scene-setting miniatures) before the pianist’s more recognisably extended ‘jazz trio’ tune, Gutenberg Press, is expanded on by Goloubev’s scampering improvisations.

The tinderbox urgency of Gunpowder and Compass cleverly incorporates the consummate beauty of J S Bach’s Fugue in C Minor, with Hutton’s own, sparkling inventiveness shining above the fizzing impetus of Sirkis and Goloubev; and Self Made Man rapidly switches into sweet romanticism, Hutton’s ear for a lyrical melody followed through by Goloubev (a bassist whose dexterity always impresses). The intentionally bumbling rhythms and Sirkis’ clattering, sputtering exchanges of weaponry in Fog of War poignantly reflect the futility of conflict, replaced by a mournful, dejected reprise of King John’s Hunting Lodge; yet, standing defiant through the ages, Old Yew is again brought into focus with an air of resigned grandeur (Hutton’s musical imagery remaining powerful).

Almost as a postscript, the spoken word of Neil Sparkes illuminates, with drama and pathos, the final two tracks’ reminder of the charter’s values of liberty and fairness (the deep, echoic sonority perhaps a touch exaggerated). Nevertheless, Thoughts Bear Heirs to Memory hinges on the majestic delivery of Sparkes’ own lines such as, “as light for trees, justice needs great ideas to grow”; and concluding As Sunlight Passes rises triumphant, with baroque flute in anthemic character.

The Alex Hutton Trio’s Magna Carta Suite exudes a well-defined Englishness, its not-your-average-piano-trio accessibility fortified by the engaging historic weave.

Released on 15 July 2015, the album is available from Alex’s website, as well as all good jazz and online retailers.

 

Alex Hutton piano
Yuri Goloubev double bass
Asaf Sirkis drums
with
Liesbeth Allart cor anglais
Liz Palmer baroque flute
Neil Sparkes spoken word

alexhuttonmusic.com

F-IRE – F-IRECD 82 (2015)