‘New Life’ – Flying Machines

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FLYING MACHINES’ maiden voyage – their eponymous debut release of 2016 – announced the soaring, anthemic drive and cirrostratus serenity of guitarist Alex Munk’s jazz-rock originals. Now, joined by regular crew mates Matt Robinson, Conor Chaplin and Dave Hamblett, the band bursts through the ozone with second album New Life, their higher aspirations reflected in cover-art astrophotography of the Veil Nebula supernova.

Read the full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 19 October 2018 and available from Bandcamp, Amazon, iTunes, etc.

 

Alex Munk guitars
Matt Robinson piano, synths, Fender Rhodes
Conor Chaplin electric bass
Dave Hamblett drums

flyingmachinesband.com

Ubuntu Music – UBU0017 (2018)

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‘Time Pieces’ – Kyle Eastwood

Kyle

OK… I need to cut to the chase…… this album has me in raptures!

New release Time Pieces, from multi-bassist and composer Kyle Eastwood, fizzes to the joyous hard-bop spirit of the classic 50s/60s Blue Note era. And, interspersed with a couple of vibrant interpretations (Herbie Hancock and Horace Silver), it’s the pacey, original compositions here which beam particularly brightly. Long-term colleagues Andrew McCormack (piano) and Quentin Collins (trumpet, flugelhorn) are joined by Brandon Allen (saxes) and Ernesto Simpson (drums) in a quintet which is slick and intuitive, yet still coruscates excitingly throughout these ten numbers.

The make-up of Kyle’s jazz identity runs deep (as eldest son of legendary actor/director Clint Eastwood, the annual family outing to Monterey Jazz Festival would introduce him early on, and backstage, to greats such as Dizzy Gillespie and Ella Fitzgerald), and so his own music is imbued with that same vitality and passion. Take, for example, fast-swinging Caipirinha which opens the set, its Brazilian flavours coloured by Eastwood’s bass extemporisations – walk into a live room with this blazing, and I swear you wouldn’t glance once at your smartphone or contemplate leaving, such is the verve served up equally by all members of the band!

Horace Silver’s Blowin’ the Blues Away rattles along breathlessly to dazzling trumpet and tenor improv, plus typically effervescent piano from the brilliant Andrew McCormack; and a beautifully contemporary reading of Herbie Hancock’s Dolphin Dance (from Maiden Voyage) is illuminated by Eastwood’s melodic fretless bass, with Quentin Collins’ flugelhorn phrasings so pleasingly reminiscent of Freddie Hubbard. Prosecco Smile seems to be Hancock-inspired, rocking out to the tight, zingy fourths of trumpet and tenor, as well as Eastwood’s upright bass dexterity; and McCormack’s Vista burns slowly and mysteriously, its steady, crescendoing expansion allowing space for thoughtful soloing.

A mark of genius comes in the leader’s Peace of Silver, in memory of Horace Silver who passed away at the time of these sessions. Rather than an elegy, it suitably honours the great man’s memory and musical character in sprightly ’60s-feel, 5/8-dominated style (though also with a sensitive solo middle section from pianist McCormack, which seems to pay personal homage) – all in all, with an overriding feeling of ‘jazz standard’, it’s a winner.

Easily imaginable as a Kenny Wheeler big band arrangement, Incantation‘s ominousness is perpetuated by an ostinato piano-and-bass undercurrent, precisely embellished by Ernesto Simpson’s percussion; and, reminded of Eastwood’s accomplishments with big-screen soundtracks, the balm-like oriental solitude of his piano and fretless bass arrangement from movie Letters from Iwo Jima is quietly affecting. Nostalgique reflects wistfully with breathy flugel and sax against delicately picked electric bass and decorative piano before breezy closer Bullet Train swings with all the stature and vigour of a Johnny Dankworth special.

Released on 20 April 2015, Time Pieces is ‘up there’ with the best. Touring this Spring/Summer, including four nights (20-23 May) at Ronnie Scott’s, London, the album is available from JazzVillage (check out the samples there), iTunes and all good jazz retailers.

 

Kyle Eastwood electric, acoustic and fretless electric basses
Brandon Allen tenor and soprano saxes
Quentin Collins trumpet, flugelhorn
Andrew McCormack piano
Ernesto Simpson drums

kyleeastwood.com

JazzVillage (Harmonia Mundi) – SP JV 9570034 (2015)