#recentlistening – September 2019 (3 of 3)

Fat-Suit – Waifs & Strays
Mark Scobbie, Stephen Henderson, Grant Cassidy, Martyn Hodge, Gus Stirrat, Dorian Cloudsley, Fraser Jackson, Craig McMahon, Alan Benzie, Moss Taylor, Ciaran McEneny, Murray McFarlane, Alex Sharples, Mateusz Sobieski, Liam Shortall, Mhairi Marwick, Laura Wilkie, Katie Rush, Rhona Macfarlane, Lissa Robertson, Colin McKee, Sarah Leonard, Nicola Boag, Rachel Wilson, David Munn, Johnny Woodham, Corinna Hewat, David Dunsmuir
Release date: 4 October 2019 (Equinox Records / Birnam CD)
fatsuit.bigcartel.com/product/fat-suit-waifsandstrayspreorder

Anthropology Band – Anthropology Band
Martin Archer, Charlotte Keeffe, Chris Sharkey, Pat Thomas, Corey Mwamba, Dave Sturt, Peter Fairclough, Kim Macari, George Murray, Ben Higham, Mick Somerset, Nathan Bettany, James Mainwaring, Hannah Brady, Riley Stone-Lonergan, Alicia Gardener-Trejo
Release date: 27 September 2019 (Discus Music)
discusmusic.bandcamp.com/album/anthropology-band-90cd

MPH – Taxonomies
Alex Maguire, Martin Pyne, Mark Hewins
Release date: 27 September 2019 (Discus Music)
discusmusic.bandcamp.com/album/taxonomies-87cd

ISQ – Requiem for the Faithful
Irene Serra, Richard Sadler, Chris Nickolls, Naadia Sheriff
Release date: 27 September 2019
isqmusic.bandcamp.com/album/requiem-for-the-faithful-2

Matthew Halsall – Oneness
Matthew Halsall, Nat Birchall, Stan Ambrose, Adam Fairhall, Gavin Barras, Gaz Hughes, Rachel Gladwin, Mohamed Assani, Chris Davies
Release date: 27 September 2019 (Gondwana Records)
matthewhalsall.bandcamp.com/album/oneness

Overground Collective – Super Mario
Chris Williams, Julie Kjær, Rachel Musson, Mike Lesirge, Tom Ward, Cath Roberts, Paul Taylor, Raph Clarkson, Olivir Haylett, Ben Kelly, Noel Langley, Yazmeen Ahmed, Andre Canniere, Chris Batchelor, Paulo Dias Duarte, Jason Simpson, Dave O’Brien, Jon Scott
Release date: 27 September 2019 (Babel Label)
babellabel.co.uk

#recentlistening – August 2019 (2 of 2)

Espen Berg Trio – Free to Play
Espen Berg, Bárður Reinert Poulsen, Simon Olderskog Albertsen 
Release date: 6 September 2019 (Odin Records)
propermusic.com/product-details/Espen-Berg-Trio-Free-To-Play-270001

Maria Chiara Argirò – Hidden Seas
Maria Chiara Argirò, Leïla Martial, Sam Rapley, Tal Janes, Andrea Di Biase, Gaspar Sena
Release date: 27 September 2019 (Cavalo Records)
mariachiaramusic.bandcamp.com/album/hidden-seas

João Lencastre’s Communion 3 – Song(s) of Hope
João Lencastre, Jacob Sacks, Eivind Opsvik
Release date: 20 September 2019 (Clean Feed)
joaolencastre.bandcamp.com/album/song-s-of-hope

Pigfoot – Pigfoot Shuffle
Chris Batchelor, James Allsopp, Liam Noble, Paul Clarvis
Release date: 6 September 2019 (Pokey Records)
chrisbatchelor.bandcamp.com/releases

Daniel Erdmann’s Velvet Revolution – Won’t Put No Flag Out
Daniel Erdmann, Théo Ceccaldi, Jim Hart
Release date: 13 September 2019 (BMC Records)
bmcrecords.hu/pages/frameset/index.php

Oddarrang – Hypermetros
Olavi Louhivuori, Osmo Ikonen, Ilmari Pohjola, Lasse Sakara, Lasse Lindgren
Release date: 27 September 2019 (Edition Records)
oddarrang.bandcamp.com/album/hypermetros

‘Red Circle’ – Simon Purcell

RedCircle

THE PURITY and completeness of the (red) circle speak profoundly about this long-awaited new quintet release from London-based pianist and composer Simon Purcell.

As Head of Jazz at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance, Purcell is primarily renowned as an educator, garnering praise and respect from many of today’s jazz artists who have benefited from his experience and guidance; so, no surprise that he was once the recipient of a Parliamentary Award for Jazz Educator of the Year. Purcell became prominent in the ’80s, including collaborations with Julian Arguelles, Eddie Henderson and Kenny Wheeler – but, by his own admission, performing and recording activities have since taken second place to his teaching career… until encouraged to cut this album.

The cover art, by artist and Methodist minister Jan Richardson, is explained in detail on her own blog – and the crux of an analogy she makes of an encounter with an artist in residence provides a revelatory insight into this recording: “…the potter stood before us, a small piece of pottery cupped in her hands. Gazing into the ‘o’ of her bowl, she began to tell us what she had come to offer. Watching her, listening to her, I had the sense that we were encountering a woman whose life and creative work had worn away the impulse to impress, to prove, to convince. In her years of working with clay, the clay had also worked on her. Shed of pretense, the potter held out to us what she had to give. It was more than sufficient.”

That realisation of ‘more than sufficient’ seems key to the intention behind Simon Purcell’s desire to now, at last, document his powerfully direct approach to music-making with long-standing friends and colleagues who share a similarly high profile on the UK jazz scene – Chris Batchelor (trumpet), Julian Siegel (saxes), Steve Watts (bass) and Gene Calderazzo (drums). As Purcell explains, he doesn’t feel any expectation to connect to a particular tradition or genre of jazz, nor for the concept to be complex – the single most importance for this band’s creativity is about where their imagination takes them and the simple enjoyment of the moment.

Recorded ‘live’ in one room, this is jazz which is both tightly structured (from Purcell’s original compositions) yet endlessly free in improvisation, displaying some affinity with the classic Blue Note sessions of the ’60s. Imagine the immediacy of Wayne Shorter’s Angola or Freddie Hubbard’s Hub’s Nub, whilst embracing the influences of the intervening years (including early jazz fusion) and employing today’s clear production techniques, and this quartet’s combined inventiveness provides heady listening which demands focused attention.

From the restless momentum of Spirit Level (a reference, perhaps, to the early ’80s vibe of Tim Richards?) to the breadth of Red Circle – Enchantress, the double-horn-led character of this quintet is enthralling. Purcell is, all at once, lyrical and searching in his own extemporisations, as well as colouring the soloing of Julian Siegel and Chris Batchelor. The scat-like riffs of Minos pave the way for Watts’ brisk, walking-bass swing; at over eleven minutes in length, Answers for Job is an immersive experience – a space for improvisation to widen; and Pandora reels to the brashness of Gene Calderazzo’s intelligent percussion– a real swinger with a big band feel. Dark Night slow-grooves to Purcell’s marked piano fifths, encouraging Siegel (on soprano) and Batchelor to push to the limits, whilst Ithaca delicately waltzes to the crystalline piano of the leader; and show-stopper Maestros and Musos flies to Batchelor’s perky trumpet, plus monster soloing from Siegel.

To close, Liane Carroll guests as vocalist on an interpretation of the earlier Ithaca. There’s something magical about a lyricist performing their own words (“May the Summer mornings be bright and plenty”), and Carroll injects her unparalleled emotional intensity and rich tone into this piano-accompanied ballad, sparingly embellished by Siegel’s soprano. A tender and optimistic conclusion.

Released on 10 November 2014 (with a launch at the 2014 EFG London Jazz Festival on 16 November), further information, promo video and purchasing can be found on the dedicated Red Circle page at Whirlwind.

 

Simon Purcell piano, compositions
Chris Batchelor
trumpet
Julian Siegel tenor and soprano saxophones
Steve Watts bass
Gene Calderazzo drums
with
Liane Carroll vocals (bonus track)

simonpurcell.com

Whirlwind Recordings – WWR4651 (2014)

’21st Century Acid Trad’ – Pigfoot

Pigfoot cover

THERE’S A REAL KICK to this debut album from Pigfoot. Not content with trotting out faithful, modest versions of 1920s and ’30s jazz standards, this acoustic ‘trad. quartet’ scratches at their familiar surface to explore – as the title hints – surprisingly gritty, off-the-wall interpretations of Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Sidney Bechet, and so on.

Founded in 2013, it turns out that Pigfoot’s anarchic line-up is an exciting who’s-who of contemporary jazz innovators – trumpeter (and founder member of Loose Tubes) Chris Batchelor; tubist Oren Marshall (to be found alongside Shabaka Hutchings in Sons of Kemet); that most influential and imaginative of pianists, Liam Noble; and drummer Paul Clarvis (find me a more expansive CV!).

It’s quite possible to imagine the odd incredulous snipe at their brash, seemingly-irreverent approach – perhaps whispers of ‘king’s new clothes’ or Bonzo Dog references (remember their wonderfully mocking late ’60s parody, Jazz (Delicious Hot, Disgusting Cold)?). But peel back the layers (see cover art), and there’s an unabashed and, I sense, affectionate desire to render these classic tunes in outlandish textures and colours to bring a freshness to them – and with that unexpectedness, they become increasingly absorbing. Indeed, I am now at the stage with this live recording – from London’s Vortex Jazz Club – that it’s difficult to eject it from the car CD player, such is the adroitness, humour and downright feel-good of these eight extended tracks.

Spencer Williams’ Basin Street Blues maintains its New Orleans origins, yet Liam Noble’s dissonant chords and Paul Clarvis’s deliberate, almost bumbling drum rhythms give it a fascinating edge. 12th Street Rag is positively outrageous with its haphazard tempi, although Oren Marshall’s steady, plodding tuba (plus a few liberties and a blustering solo) keeps some semblance of order, Chris Batchelor blasting melodies in various keys – perfect (or, happily, ‘imperfect’!). Fats Waller’s Jitterbug Waltz rattles along impetuously, the improvisations becoming more and more jaunty and extreme until, ultimately, triple time breaks helplessly and wonderfully into Wilson Pickett’s In the Midnight Hour. Tennessee Waltz eases the pace, Batchelor stating its deep southern spiritual tune which Noble then carries away to extemporise in typically jarred invention (it works so well against fluttering drums and drawling tuba).

Gospel pairing Just a Closer Walk with Thee and His Eye is on the Sparrow teases with a fairly straight rendition, Batchelor’s bright trumpet melody eventually signalling disorder which includes a belting, bluesy tuba solo – and Clarvis takes full advantage of the mayhem before the four conclude ‘repentantly’. Pigfoot clearly revel in the Duke Ellington favourite Mood Indigo, disassembling it with ease, but never straying completely from its familiarity; Batchelor’s impressive muted and spurting trumpet techniques are a key feature. And there’s more than a touch of mischief to Sidney Bechet’s tangoing Petite Fleur – but the experience of these guys is evident as they hold it together with various random acts of rebellion.

1920s standard Nobody Knows You When You’re Down is a closing show-stealer. Batchelor’s forlorn, inebriated trumpet (“Once I lived the life of a millionaire, spendin’ my money, I didn’t care”) sets up this beautifully bold ten-minute slow blues, the quartet presenting a typically audacious and stoic response to its original themes of prosperity fail. The conviction and, yes, humour in this performance (especially Oren Marshall’s tuba) provides a suitably profuse conclusion to these fifty entertaining minutes of ‘acid trad’.

Released on 31 March 2014, with the quartet touring in the Autumn, this is a rollickingly great experience to seek out – it certainly brings a smile to my face. In fact, I happily concur with Bessie Smith – ‘Gimme a Pigfoot (and a Bottle of Beer)’!


Chris Batchelor
trumpet
Oren Marshall tuba
Liam Noble piano
Paul Clarvis drums

Village Life – 131112VL (2014)