‘Cross-Platform Interchange’ – Misha Mullov-Abbado

MishaM-A

IT SAYS MUCH about the rude health of the British contemporary jazz scene when an album such as London-based Misha Mullov-Abbado’s Cross-Platform Interchange makes its arrival with this level of young, high-spirited musicality.

The bassist’s second album – “dedicated to my love of trains, travelling, movement and constantly evolving musical journeys” – is a breath of fresh air as eight original, often European-inflected compositions offer an entertaining ‘itinerary’ of verve, lucid beauty and obvious humour, all delivered by a three-horn septet augmented with guest musicians. Mullov-Abbado’s musical progression comes as no surprise (the son of acclaimed classical artists Viktoria Mullova and the late Claudio Abbado), yet he has already embarked on his own creative route which appears to take in so many influences.

These fifty-seven minutes are, indeed, something of an eclectic sightseeing adventure, with the winding, bluesy, ‘in-crowd’ bass-groove of Shanti Bell announcing its departure, whilst a steam-filled segue accelerates into high-speed Mariachi folk tune No Strictly Dancing, characterised by James Davison’s blistering trumpet and the hissing perpetual motion provided by drummer Scott Chapman and percussionist Elad Neeman. Mullov-Abbado explains that these compositions have been written, performed and honed over a two-year period, so they take inspiration from different sources. The echoic, tumbling-sax atmospheres of Waves divert into a pictorial vista stretching for miles; and its deep, reedy, dance-band elegance suggests romantic evocations of early 20th Century rail travel (dedicated with love to the bassist’s stepfather, Matthew Barley, whose cello adornments can be heard here); and Still, Hidden Morning‘s hazy aurora again tumbles into swiftly-travelling percussiveness, illuminated by Liam Diunachie’s deft, US-soul piano improvisations as well as the vividly-phrased, fluctuating impressions of fleeting landscapes from saxophonists Matthew Herd and Sam Rapley, and James Davison on flugel.

‘Wensleydale-and-cracker’ antics in Gromit’s Grand Outing (complete with animated, Nick Park sound effects) mischievously bluster to Mullov-Abbado’s flapper-style fast-walking bass – but behind the madcap comedy are some great, bubbling, trad-jazz-club solo turns from the melodicists (the Mozart didn’t go unnoticed!). Pure 100% Nunnery‘s cool-cat sax lines nonchalantly shuffle (cue the tea dance), breaking into magnificent, Louis Armstrong-style abandon/cacophony before its exaggerated swoons hint at the opening titles of ‘That Darn Cat’. Blithe title track Cross-Platform Interchange hits an irresistible Stateside groove, thanks to Rob Luft’s rhythm guitar and Dunachie’s piano, along with a smooth horn-quartet backing (including bass trombonist Yusuf Narcin); and Latinesque Hair of the Bop‘s elaborate conga patterns and trumpet/sax melodies infuse the closing festivities with delectable, Mexican warmth as Mullov-Abbado’s express disappears around the cove.

An album of new music imbued with Misha-Mullov Abbado’s cultural experiences, Cross-Platform Interchange teems with life and cheer.

Released on 19 May 2017 and available as CD or digital download at Bandcamp.

 

Misha Mullov-Abbado double bass, bass guitar
James Davison trumpet, flugelhorn
Matthew Herd alto saxophone
Sam Rapley tenor saxophone, clarinet
Liam Dunachie piano, Fender Rhodes
Scott Chapman drums
Elad Neeman percussion
with 
Nick Goodwin acoustic guitar
Rob Luft electric guitar
Matthew Barley cello
Yusuf Narcin bass trombone

mishamullovabbado.com

Edition Records – EDN1091 (2017)

‘Liberetto III’ – Lars Danielsson

Liberetto III

A KEY FASCINATION with Swedish bassist, cellist and composer Lars Danielsson’s Liberetto III is that his original music’s instrumental fluctuations and juxtapositions frequently pose thoughts of “What is that instrument or combination of sounds?”

The third of the bassist/composer’s recordings under this title again brings together guitarist John Paricelli and drummer Magnus Öström to form the core quartet, this time with pianist Grégory Privat; and as before, some of Danielsson’s twelve new pieces also feature a clutch of guests (including returning trumpeter Arve Henriksen) to further varicolour the attractive, pictorialised soundscapes.

German label ACT Music (this year celebrating its 25th anniversary) has successfully continued to discover and nurture a distinctive, European ‘family’ of artists; and Danielsson’s output is very much a part of its prolific release catalogue – typically cosmopolitan, infused with cross-cultural atmospheres and refractions, defined by a welcome lack of boundary. Describing the project’s development, he refers to the band having a ‘sixth sense’ which comes from playing together so much; and this surely is a factor in why this array of ebullient, haunting and even spiritual expressions melds together so well across the album’s fifty-five minutes.

Lars Danielsson’s melodic approach is not unlike that of German bassist Eberhard Weber, and his bright, lyrical vibrato is prominent in opening numbers Preludium and Agnus Dei, with the latter’s warm, hymnal equilibrium emphasised by Arve Henriksen’s subtle trumpet and Björn Bohlin’s oboe d’amore. With Magnus Öström driving the precise energy of numbers such as Lviv, there’s a pleasing inevitability of his brushed perpetuum mobile summoning e.s.t., confirmed by Danielsson’s searing, screeching strings in Dawn Dreaming. Hussam Aliwat’s oud and John Paracelli’s acoustic guitar enhance the dusky, heated Arabic flavours of Taksim by Night and also (showcasing Grégory Privat’s rapid, pianistic flair) catchy Sonata in Spain.

The clear, reverential aspects of the bassist’s compositions and arrangements are particularly magnetic – from the melancholy trumpet phrasing and wordless vocal of Henriksen in Orationi (which also features an achingly beautiful solo from Danielsson) to a similarly wistful pastorale, Da Salo, painted with exquisite, teardrop watercolours from Bohlin’s English horn. The appealing African-lute timbres of Danielsson’s gimbri are given a contemporary twist in Gimbri Heart as chromatic trumpet and sustained effects prompt rock guitar from Paricelli; and the echoic, French elegance of Mr Miller (US bassist Marcus Miller also, incidentally, a master of the gimbri) suggests the romanticism of Fauré’s ‘Pavane’ and Ravel’s ‘Bolero’ – glimpses of European classical and folk, throughout this album, add so much.

To close, affably scurrying guitar lollipop Affretando spreads soft sunshine with theme-tune-like memorability until slow, eventide bossa nova Berchidda seemingly honours Antônio Carlos Jobim in sublime suspension, featuring Danielsson’s dulcet high-bass melodies, with great attention to detail.

Released on 26 May 2017, Liberetto III somehow casts a spell… a real joy to hear, again and again.

Available from ACT Music, Amazon and iTunes.

 

Lars Danielsson double bass, cello, piano, wah-wah cello, gimbri
Grégory Privat piano, Fender Rhodes
John Paricelli guitars
Magnus Öström drums, percussion
with guests
Arve Henriksen trumpet
Dominic Miller acoustic guitar
Hussam Aliwat oud
Björn Bohlin English horn, oboe d’amore
Mathias Eick trumpet

ACT Music – Act 9840-2

‘Signals’ – Sue Rynhart

mrsuesue_002_cd_artwork_updated

“STAND UP, MAKE IT HAPPEN, live your precious life, stay on your path and lose your way

It only took a few short excerpts to be drawn into the magic of Dublin-based vocalist and songwriter Sue Rynhart’s twelve-track album Signals. A collection of jazz-inflected folk compositions, it continues the partnership with Dan Bodwell established in 2014’s debut release Crossings. The revelation is that the perceived acoustic simplicity of voice and double bass actually presents such a richness of unpredictable artistry, with Rynhart’s imaginative and individualistic approach perhaps comparable to Björk and Lauren Kinsella, and her synergy with the multi-faceted technique of Bodwell endlessly compelling (so much so that a shiver of emotional pleasure is never far away).

Melding melodic Irish folk tradition and enigmatic poetry with oblique, atmospheric twists, the duo radiates a beautiful, contemporary freedom of spirit. Rynhart’s pure, dextrous voice communicates her original writing in a personal, storytelling way that suggests it simply wells up from inside and demands to be heard, whilst Bodwell’s pizzicato-dancing bass is able to shift into arco lyricism and mystery. Descending-bass jazz number Be Content has a catchy familiarity, whilst smouldering Foxed couples a subtle, thrummed bass groove with Rynhart’s wide, enquiring phrases (“Oh little red fox I know you’ve been there, but today your coat looks brighter than a gemstone rare”). Dramatic whisperings and close-to-the bridge bass creaks in The Tree precede a plaintive annunciation which becomes elaborated with wisps of choral psalmody and the classically-interpreted folk of E J Moeran or Vaughan Williams; Little Sparrow‘s autumnal melancholy is simple and tender; and The Coldest Month‘s openness lilts with harmonic bass colour.

Closely layered vocals in Compassion are extraordinarily intricate, and haunting harmonies in a new interpretation of In Dulci Jubilo (with multi-instrumentalist guest Francesco Turrisi providing drum rhythm) suggest the period work of Trio Mediaeval. A contemporary edge is maintained by the dark, arco bass and fluid vocalisations of In Between, accentuated by Rynhart’s persistent mbira chimes; and Black as the Crow Flies (“Twinkle twinkle are your eyes tonight, black as the crow flies on a new moon and never went home”) stands out with its hushed tones and an especially captivating, pliant bass motif from Bodwell. Sue Rynhart paints so vividly with words and music, the repeated phrases of solo piece Summer Bell offering an impression of distant peals across endless fields; Turrisi’s baroque-ornamented then rock-grooving lute in Silliest Game perfectly complements the elegant, bittersweetness of this new Irish folk song; and Wall, Wall, Another Wall closes with a dreamy overlay of speech and floating, sung phrases.

Signals is different… original… and enchantingly transports us to another place. “Lose your way and I’ll follow you.”

Released on 28 April 2017 and available as CD or vinyl from Sue Rynhart’s website, or as a digital download from Amazon or iTunes.

 

Sue Rynhart voice, mbira, recorders, zither
Dan Bodwell double bass
with
Francesco Turrisi lute, medieval drum

suerynhart.com

mrsuesue Records – MRSUESUE 002 (2017)

‘Songbook’ – Georgia Mancio & Alan Broadbent

Songbook

THOSE MOMENTS when, no matter how much of a lifetime’s river of music has passed under the bridge, the eyes involuntarily well up and an electrical impulse charges down the spine… they can only be the sign of something artistically and emotionally significant.

A project which originated in 2013 and has since toured a number of times, Songbook is the work of double Grammy award-winning pianist, composer and arranger Alan Broadbent and sublime vocalist and lyricist Georgia Mancio. A chanced-upon opportunity to perform together, as a duo, blossomed into a magical songwriting collaboration, with Broadbent revealing more and more of his existing instrumental compositions for Mancio to complete with imaginative, poetic storytelling. Their mutual enthusiasm for Great American Songbook writers such as Rodgers and Hart cemented a creative, thematic empathy which shapes this album of twelve new songs with unique beauty and warmth – so much so that, consequently, each one has a ‘timeless standard’ identity redolent of, say, Cole Porter or Jerome Kern.

Supported by the subtly-nuanced and precise rhythm section of double bassist Oli Hayhurst and drummer Dave Ohm, the finesse of Broadbent’s piano and Mancio’s immaculately controlled voice sparkle throughout with expressions of joy, humour, tenderness and melancholy. Alan Broadbent’s lush arrangements (having worked on a larger scale over the decades with the likes of Irene Kral, Woody Herman, Natalie Cole and Diana Krall) are just as eloquent in this chamber setting.

Georgia Mancio enfolds each episode of this collection with both technical security and, just as importantly, an obvious affection. She possesses one of the most inviting, endearing voices on the current scene, illuminating The Journey Home‘s soft swing with clarity and elegance, then adding pizzazz to shuffling bossa tune Someone’s Sun; and Broadbent’s chordal and melodic deftness complements the vocal shaping magnificently. The Last Goodbye – the first composition presented to Mancio – is brightly wistful, as is Cherry Tree which charmingly portrays the tapestry of life (reflected in Simon Manfield’s front and back cover illustrations, and also in Alan Broadbent’s exquisite ornamentation). Each track becomes a favourite, Small Wonder‘s succinct lyrics making way for blue-sky piano trio delicacy; and One for Bud celebrates a passion for Bud Powell with a brisk be-bop delivery from Mancio which would be at home in any classic song-and-dance movie (“I went to work – 9 to 5. I concentrated on the boss and his jive. His patter and zeal held no inch of appeal compared to Bud.”).

Hide Me From the Moonlight‘s emotional weight is superb, its descending/ascending chromatics and tenuti making it a romantic stand-out. Heartwarming, ‘Que Sera, Sera’-style Forever is Mancio’s playful take on life, concluding with “One day you find that you have all the answers but nobody asks you the questions”; and ease-back Close to the Moon might easily have been in Sinatra’s repertoire. Where the Soft Winds Blow blithely sails to a memorable melody written by a 17-year-old Alan Broadbent; chattering calypso Just Like a Child‘s slick, rhythmic vocal could be central to a much-loved musical; and serene Lullaby for MM (Broadbent, here, writing to Mancio’s personal dedication to her late father) somehow evokes the touching reminiscences of Michel Legrand.

There’s the sense of an hour standing still with this recording (skilfully produced by Andrew Cleyndert), such is its affecting dedication to craft – and certainly a highlight of 2017 so far. As just one of many attractive lines states: “I see life through your eyes and take first prize”.

Released on 23 April 2017, Songbook is available from Georgia Mancio’s website and Amazon.

 

Georgia Mancio voice, lyrics
Alan Broadbent piano, music
Oli Hayhurst double bass
Dave Ohm drums, percussion

georgiamancio.com
alanbroadbent.com

Roomspin Records – 1923 (2017)

 

‘The Chamber Music Effect’ – Vein

GIVEN THE proliferation of jazz piano trios out there, there’s something remarkably open and inviting about Vein’s ‘chamber music effect’.

Pianist Michael Arbenz, drummer Florian Arbenz and bassist Thomas Lähns have been around a while – after just over a decade together, this is the Swiss trio’s tenth album; and with a cover lobe reminiscent of Manfred Mann’s ‘The Roaring Silence’, The Chamber Music Effect is very much about audible space – ‘the gaps in-between’ – as well as the sheer, percussive dynamism of their performance. The album title and ethos stem from their classical training, as well as the freedom of interpretation to be found in chamber works, which reflects the band’s philosophy: “interplay and the greatest possible equality for all members”.

Comparisons might well include The Bad Plus and Get the Blessing – it’s that kind of edgy, purposeful and unpredictable approach. But the enduring wonder of this stripped-down, no-hiding-place format is that each has its own identity – and Vein are no exception.

The writing of eight original compositions, across 48 minutes, is mainly provided by each of the Arbenz twins – and it’s a tour de force, both technically and emotionally. Boarding the Beat‘s impetuous groove is characterised by the falling-semitone figure of Thomas Lähns’ double bass (shades of Dan Berglund), the crashing, rapid-fire piano of Michael Arbenz, and Florian Arbenz’s fizzing percussion – straightaway, the democratic method is evident. Prelude suggests a subtle, searching air of ‘Bouncing with Bud’, its intimate swing buoyed throughout by pliant bass; and Poème de Nuit‘s slow, nighttime wanderings, delicately illuminated with chimes, offers a beguiling calm.

But Vein are capricious. In Medias Res‘s crackling chromaticism is a compelling listen, contrasting attitudinal stomp with florid, breathtaking piano runs; and Ode to the Sentimental Knowledge‘s sumptuous, chordal beauty intimates Bill Evans, though with pervasive, contemporary colour from Florian Arbenz’s kit. Quirky udu timbres announce Sheherezade – a punctuated groove which combines the lively rapport between Florian Arbenz and Thomas Lähns with incisive, bluesy piano lines; and curious arco bass harmonics are a feature of Lähns’ spacious, mysteriously rippling Pastorale.

Who knows whether Michael Arbenz’s attractive piano in this video of snappy closer, Ballet of the Monkeys, is simply a piece of ‘steam punk’ theatre or the real deal – but it provides a great snapshot of this band’s bracing energy.

Released on 21 April 2017, The Chamber Music Effect is available from Amazon, iTunes, etc.

 

Michael Arbenz piano
Thomas Lähns double bass
Florian Arbenz drums

vein.ch

UTR 4716 (2017)

‘Self-Identity’ – Ollie Howell

Self-Identity

THE SLEEVE of a seminal early-1970s 12″ vinyl jested that its contents could not ‘be played on old tin boxes, no matter what they are fitted with’ – maybe a prophetic warning to a quick-grab, smartphone-to-the-ear generation to come. But such wisdom was recalled when soaking up this second release, as leader, from British drummer and composer Ollie Howell.   

Self-Identity follows 2013 debut album Sutures and Stitches, and the intervening years have seen Howell’s career flourish, with the great Quincy Jones’ “360-degree beautiful young cat” compliment leading to him selecting the drummer for the opening residency, this year, at his Q’s jazz club in the luxurious Palazzo Versace Dubai.

Expanded to a sextet, with the addition of guitarist Ant Law, this line-up is completed by tenor saxophonist Duncan Eagles, trumpeter Henry Spencer, pianist Matt Robinson, double bassist Max Luthert; and ‘old tin boxes’ are definitely out, because what is striking – both about Howell’s arrangements and this Real World Studios recording – is the rhythmic sonority which he, Robinson and Luthert achieve. So, spanning some seventy minutes, the consistent appeal of these twelve original numbers is not so much the tuneful hook, but rather the slickness of the groove and the ensemble’s overarching synergy which provides fertile ground for confident, melodic soloing – and an especially tight link-up between tenor and trumpet.

Syncopated, leaping figures in Shadows typify the approach as unison piano bass and double bass riffs are driven by Howell’s exacting, versicoloured lead; and the album’s pervading optimism is continued with the bright sax-and-trumpet lines of Resurge. Echoic electronics play their part, too, transitorily segueing the usual broadness of the writing, as well as enhancing the ‘timeslip’ intro to ruminative, brushed Almost TomorrowRise and Fall‘s central vibrancy rocks to Eagles’ deep tenor improv and Law’s fretboard agility, whilst the rhythmic prominence of pianist Matt Robinson in Moving On and Knew is impressive.

Howell’s compositions are roomy, so not only do their ‘passing clouds’ of ideas have the effect of shedding fluctuating light on their progression, they also encourage freedom of individual expression. Balancing Stones‘ dynamic range illustrates this well (including delicate timbres from the leader’s kit), as does The Unknown with its dual-horn assertiveness; and Coming Home‘s subtle, opening blend of folk/hymn tune and Balkan-imbued percussion provides the springboard for breezy, closing showcases from Howell’s players.

Eschew the tinny headphones or portable speakers… and find a way to bask in the rewarding ‘hi fidelity’ of Self-Identity.

Released on 14 April 2017 and available as CD or digital download from Bandcamp, and at iTunes.

 

Ollie Howell drums, electronics, compositions
Duncan Eagles tenor saxophone
Henry Spencer trumpet
Ant Law electric guitar
Matt Robinson piano, Rhodes, electronics
Max Luthert double bass

ollie howell.com

Ropeadope (2017)

‘Identity’ – Patrick Lester-Rourke

CD DigiPak 6 Panel 1 Tray

PATRICK LESTER-ROURKE’s debut release arrives with no preconceptions. An undiscovered hour-long statement from a young and hitherto unknown musician. But its eclecticism and multifariousness – presented with an overarching, homemade ardency – makes Identity beguiling.

A graduate of Birmingham Conservatoire, the audio engineer, composer and performer was inspired by the concept of Miles Davis’ seminal 1970 double album Bitches Brew; specifically the idea of assembling an experimentally receptive ensemble to produce fresh, extended diversities of sound. That said, Lester-Rourke and his twelve collaborators (see below) create a musical landscape which is far from inaccessible, segueing elements of jazz, folk, pop/rock, prog and funk with free improvisation, electronic washes and audio soundbites.

Such a melange could be perceived as a lack of identity – yet Lester Rourke fashions it creatively, so there’s no let-up in a rhythmical and textural richness which also interweaves intangible retro glimmers of television soundtrack. The unfolding, flailing mystery of An-ka erupts into echoic, Israeli-inflected alto saxophone and ascending violin over crashing electric guitar and a cacophonous wall of sound, whilst expansive Soor-yo-day‘s gradual progression is exotically coloured with Spanish guitar and trumpet, seized upon by rapid-fire heavy rock.

But it’s not all climactic drama. Drus-ka-moma‘s mischievous bass clarinet figure sets up a spiralling gypsy-fiddle dance from Ning-Ning Li, its solid backing including trumpet, tremulant organ and bubbling synth, all carried on a wave of syncopated hand clapping; and Ow-in na shoor‘s folksy ’60s vibe features an attractive guitar round which is disseminated throughout the band.

There’s a splendid double bass, wah-wah guitar and bass synth funk groove to Get Movin’, prompting infectiously chattering organ as well as trumpet/sax banter between Alex Astbury and Josh Scofield (the raw, unpolished feel is rather charming). Scratchy guitar-rock Tear it Down channels The Sweet, Nirvana or Kaiser Chiefs (choose your era), interspersed with TV-theme melodies for trumpet and violin; and …A Cultural Clash closes with distinctly abstract ambience.

Unusual, genre-defying, quirky… but certainly both fascinating and listenable.

Released on 10 April 2017, Identity is available as a digital album from Bandcamp, CD BabyAmazon and iTunes.

 

Patrick Lester-Rourke audio engineer, composer
Josh Schofield alto saxophone
Ning-Ning Li violin
Alex Astbury trumpet
Alex Roche acoustic guitar
Matthew Price electric guitar
Oliver Law electric guitar
Tom Harris grand piano
David Ferris organ
Vittorio Mura bass clarinet
Ben Weatherill bass synth
Aram Bahmaie double bass
Gwilym Jones drums

plester-rourke.co.uk

PL-RP001 (2017)