REVIEW: ‘Worry Not’ – Emma Johnson’s Gravy Boat

THE LAST fifteen, pandemic-dominated months have undoubtedly pulled focus on our mercurial emotions. So the premise of debut release Worry Not, from Leeds-based tenorist/composer Emma Johnson and her quintet, resonates all the more loudly.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 2 July 2021, Worry Not is available as CD or download at Bandcamp.

 

Emma Johnson tenor saxophone
Fergus Vickers electric guitar
Richard Jones piano
Angus Milne double bass
Steve Hanley drums

johnsonmusic.co.uk

Self-released (2021)

REVIEW: ‘Sankofa’ – Amaro Freitas

THERE’S ALWAYS a frisson of excitement when a left-field approach to ‘piano trio’ comes into view; and an online search for ‘Amaro Freitas’ soon returns live video which goes towards confirming the audio essence of new album Sankofa – that of a man who is utterly and perhaps even spiritually absorbed in his instrument and his music-making.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 25 June 2021 and available as CD, vinyl and digital download at Bandcamp.

 

Amaro Freitas piano
Hugo Medeiros drums, percussion
Jean Elton double bass

amarofreitas.com

Far Out Recordings (2021)

REVIEW: ‘Perihelion’ – Guido Spannocchi

COOL AS YOU LIKE, Viennese alto saxophonist Guido Spannocchi’s Perihelion (a title referencing the position in the orbit of a planet where it’s nearest to the sun) has ‘summer’ written all over it!

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 14 May 2021, Perihelion is available from Audioguido Records.

 

Jay Phelps trumpet
Guido Spannocchi alto saxophone
Sylvie Leys tenor saxophone
Robert Mitchell Wurlitzer, piano
Michelangelo Scandroolio double bass
Tristan Banks drums

Composed, arranged and produced by Guido Spannocchi

audioguido.com

Audioguido Records (2021)

REVIEW: ‘Close to Home’ – Ari Erev

EVER THE MELODICIST and bestower of hope and light, Israeli pianist Ari Erev releases Close to Home, the follow-up to 2016 album Flow.

Continuing the configuration of piano trio augmented by soprano saxophone and percussion (plus, on this occasion, flute), Erev again presents a considerable breadth of original composition and reinterpretation – over 70 minutes, in fact. Within this music is a beauty which clearly amplifies its overarching title, referencing his deep emotions for family, friends and familiar places – a sentiment which has been pulled into sharp relief for so many, over the past year or so.

The pianist’s deliberate yet rubato expression can sometimes be reminiscent of Abdullah Ibrahim – there’s a warmth and a focus there that reflects both his experience and this album’s theme. In addition, the subtly detuned tone of his instrument creates a ‘chamber’ aura of intimate recital or jazz bar, even with occasional traces of traditional music hall. However you might define this ensemble’s collective sound, it’s a congenial blend.

Curiously, from a purely personal perspective, the opening two numbers – Israeli Story and Playground – don’t necessarily foretell the elegance and interest of the hour which then follows them. But then, immediately in Childhood Scenes, is found the most dreamy, slightly nostalgic trio waltz – an example of how Erev’s originally-stated themes frequently have a recollective dimension, suggesting they might also host a vocal lyric first heard many moons ago. Chipper Falling in Place crackles with Yuval Cohen’s soprano-led exuberance as bassist Assaf Hakimi and drummer Gasper Bertoncelj drive it forward with panache, while Old Friends’ chromatic figure possesses a tentative air. Another ruminative original, Saturday Coffee, features lithe sax improvisations, as well as posing a thought of how the richer timbres of tenor or baritone might also suit the pianist’s output. In Afar (for Tal), though, Cohen’s high register is gracefully interlaced with the flute of Hadar Noiberg, fashioning a particularly homely, trad-jazz-tinged dedication to Erev’s daughter.

In terms of other composers’ works, the emotive, Brazilian shades of Debora Gurgel’s Para Sempre (Forever) find greater mobility with Erev, accented by the percussion of Gilad Dobrecky; and the solid beat of Efraim Shamir’s Shi’ur Moledet (Homeland Class) – from successful Israeli pop band Kavaret – is significantly reworked as a melodramatic, almost silent-movie-styled episode whose percussion impetuously tugs the piano trio towards an excitable Latin groove. Keith Jarrett’s So Tender (known to many in his breezy recording with Gary Peacock and Jack De Johnette) is respectfully visited in a sparkling, bossa miniature; Olha Maria (Antonio Carlos Jobim) flows tenebrously; and Paul Simon’s evergreen Still Crazy After All These Years enjoys a pleasant, countrified outing. To close, Erev’s assuredly grooving Po (Here) displays a theme-tune quality, its bright, memorable melody expanded on by saxophone and piano.

At the heart of this recording and, indeed, Erev’s own pianistic delivery is a sense of both conviviality and gratitude; and his own compositional flair perhaps has the greatest appeal in this collection. Falling in Place is certainly an irresistible, tightly executed, good-time gem!

Released on 8 June 2021, Close to Home is available at Bandcamp.

 

Ari Erev piano
Assaf Hakimi double bass, bass guitar
Gasper Bertoncelj drums
with
Yuval Cohen soprano saxophone
Hadar Noiberg flute
Gilad Dobrecky percussion

arierev.com

(2021)

REVIEW: ‘Turn Out The Stars – The Music of Bill Evans’ – Pinheiro – Ineke – Cavalli

BILL EVANS (1929 – 1980) and the piano. Inextricably connected, or so it would seem. But this new recording from Portuguese guitarist Ricardo Pinheiro, Dutch drummer Eric Ineke and Italian double bassist Massimo Cavalli takes us along different avenues to explore a number of the revered pianist’s creations, alongside works by Michel Legrand and Leonard Bernstein.

Individually, the members of ‘Pinheiro – Ineke – Cavalli’ have built long-ranging careers and discographies – see links below. Together, they share a number of recordings, including 2018’s Triplicity and ensemble releases such as Is Seeing Believing? (a quintet with saxophonist David Liebman and pianist Mário Laginh) and Lisbon Sunset (a collection of jazz, poetry and improvisation with poet Barry Wallenstein, pianist Luís Barrigas and drummer Jorge Moniz).

In truth, guitar encounters with Bill Evans’ catalogue have happened before, including John McLaughlin’s ambient-styled acoustic album of 1993; and Evans recorded with both Kenny Burrell and Jim Hall, the latter in duo albums Undercurrent and Intermodulation. Through the timbres and dynamics available to this particular trio, six of the pianist’s compositions are texturally and rhythmically refashioned in a collaboration that might cursorily be catalogued ‘easy-listening jazz guitar trio’. But, speaking from experience, these are precise interactions which benefit from a greater focus to appreciate their inner workings.

Peri’s Scope launches the main programme of Evans interpretations, the original‘s piano-trio jauntiness translating into a fleet, foursquare expedition that ripples with crisp percussion, fast-walking bass and the lissome extemporisations of guitarist Pinheiro. There’s a similar twist of momentum for Very Early (from Evans’ ‘Moon Beams’ album with Chuck Israels and Paul Motian) where its lazy, hazy demeanour is alternatively painted in lighter, gossamer shades – the sense of ‘conversation’ even more palpable as the trio members share ideas and encourage snippets of arco bass, percussive sparkle and melodic freedom. Perhaps even more interesting is how they convey Interplay (fronted by Freddie Hubbard and Jim Hall in Evans’ bustling early-Sixties recording) as a blithe amble, nevertheless kept on its toes by the crackle of Ineke’s teasing snare offbeats.

It’s difficult to imagine that most enduring of Bill Evans ballads, Waltz for Debby, away from the master’s sublime, mellow pianism – but the trio treat it with reverence, Pinheiro’s elegant chordal shapes carrying it through into a newfound, joyful and almost pirouetting waltz brimming with sprightly extemporisation. Turn Out the Stars (later Evans) and Time Remembered are merged into a ten-minute-plus reading that, depending on your view, either becomes an immersive discovery or can dissolve into the background; either way, its eventual development into freer territory is attractive as Pinheiro’s use of overlaid, sustained effects is matched by bass and drum turbulence.

Bookending the Evans revisitations are two evergreens of stage and screen, once recorded by the pianist – Michel Legrand’s You Must Believe in Spring (from 1967 French movie ‘The Young Girls of Rochefort’) and Leonard Bernstein’s Some Other Time (from the 1944 musical ‘On the Town’). Divorced from its romantic piano (and orchestral) origins, the Legrand enjoys its unexpected excursion into a Sixties-pop-riff kinda groove; and Bernstein’s sentimental classic – recorded by Tony Bennett and Evansis ‘vocalised’ here by subtly pedalled guitar.

Though completely accessible, it may take a while to get deeper under the skin of Turn Out the Stars – but ‘Pinheiro – Ineke – Cavalli’ have both the integrity and the charm to enable us to catch these classics in refreshing, new light.

Released on 30 April 20211 and available from Challenge Records and Proper Music.

 

Ricardo Pinheiro guitar
Eric Ineke drums
Massimo Cavalli double bass

ricardopinheiro.com
ericineke.com
massimocavalli.com

Challenge Records – CR73523 (2021)

REVIEW: ‘Dance Little Lady, Dance Little Man’ – Sam Braysher Trio

THE BOLD, SOLID COLOURS of renowned Argentinian artist (and musician) Mariano Gil introduce Dance Little Lady, Dance Little Man – a new recording from London-based alto saxophonist Sam Braysher in an essentially chordless trio with double bassist Tom Farmer and drummer/percussionist Jorge Rossy.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 22 April 2021, Dance Little Lady, Dance Little Man is available from Sam Braysher’s online shop.

 

Sam Braysher alto saxophone
Tom Farmer double bass
Jorge Rossy drums, vibraphone, marimba

sambraysher.com

Unit Records – UTR 4951 (2021)