REVIEW: ‘The Sleepless Kind’ – Andy Fleet ft. Andre Canniere

THE NAME of trumpeter Andre Canniere is familiar across the UK contemporary jazz scene; but perhaps less so, the jazz-inflected pop of pianist, vocalist and songwriter Andy Fleet.

Following his previous albums The Night Falls Fast and Takin’ Aim, Fleet’s The Sleepless Kind picks up a theme which seems to permeate his musical output – an ‘ode to the night’ which (presumably reflecting his years as a lounge pianist) ‘recounts tales of the sticky lights of Soho in the small hours’. As before, it’s Canniere’s muted, Paolo Fresu-style trumpet which strongly evokes jazz-bar auras; and alongside bassist Zane Maertens and drummer Joe Evans, there are appearances from electric guitarist Pete Kershaw, saxophonist/flautist Chez Taylor and backing vocalist Sarah Doe.   

Andy Fleet’s straight-ahead approach is beguiling, not least because the riffs and sequences of these songs subtly imply inspiration from previous decades, and it can take the memory some persuading to deliver the result! But also, his MOR vocals possess an almost reassuring ‘glow’ – listen to the gentle bop of Stolen Years to imagine Colin Blunstone, or the soft, storytelling wistfulness of I’ve Had It All to recall the chart hits of Dean Friedman. There’s even a fond reminder of Gilbert O’Sullivan in bluesy, up-tempo “don’t wanna seem like a drama queen” Been There, Drunk That.

The telephone-line opening to All Broke Out With The Blues may feel a little obvious, but its smoky solace – again with Canniere’s sultry improvisation – is reminiscent of Randy Newman’s finest. Rock-grooving Love’s Enemy (Supertramp meets Bryan Adams) confidently struts; and there’s even a hint of Neil Tennant in gentle, memorable Through Closed Eyes, its 1980s backing vocal and flute intimating the fragile hope of a poignant movie scene.

If this all sounds like a disconnected melange, Andy Fleet actually has the ability to cohesively fashion new soft-pop/rock, complemented by the jazz inflections of Andre Canniere, into an album which I’ve now replayed many times. In the afterglow, pour a dram and ease back to this retro-styled songbook.    

Released on 31 March 2020 and available as CD or digital download from Bandcamp.

 

Andy Fleet piano, vocals
Andre Canniere trumpet
Zane Maertens bass
Joe Evans drums
with
Pete Kershaw electric guitar
Chez Taylor saxophone, flute
Sarah Doe backing vocals

Illustration by Alban Low

andyfleet.com

Low Vinyl Records / Cadiz – LV1608 (2020)

REVIEW: ‘Connections: without borders’ – Julian Costello Quartet

IT’S NOT DIFFICULT to warm to a recording whose character reflects that of its leader – and in Connections: without bordersJulian Costello and his quartet interpret the saxophonist’s original chamber jazz writing which meanders between wistfulness, adventure and perky mischief.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 28 February 2020 and available from 33 Jazz RecordsAmazon, Apple Music, etc.

 

Julian Costello tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone
Maciek Pysz electric guitar, classical guitar
Jakub Cywinski double bass
Adam Teixeira drums, percussion

juliancostello.co.uk

33 Jazz Records – 33JAZZ283 (2020)

REVIEW: ‘Hidden Seas’ – Maria Chiara Argirò

PIANIST AND COMPOSER Maria Chiara Argirò’s 2017 album The Fall Dance arrived like a bolt out of the blue – an unexpected, emotional swirl from a sextet featuring the striking vocalisations of Leïla Martial. Now, follow-up release Hidden Seas takes a particularly pelagic theme, allowing Argirò’s imaginative, often driving artistry to swim freely.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 27 September 2019 and available as CD, 12″ vinyl and download from Bandcamp.

 

Maria Chiara Argirò piano, synthesizers, Fender Rhodes, Mellotron
Sam Rapley tenor saxophone, clarinet
Tal Janes electric guitar, acoustic guitar (percussion on Ocean)
Andrea Di Biase double bass
Gaspar Sena drums, percussion (vocals on Nautilus)
Leïla Martial vocals
featuring
Mauro Polito programming

www.mariachiaramusic.com

Cavalo Records (2019)

REVIEW: ‘Som En Faldskærm’ – Hvalfugl

THIS BIZARRE SIGHTING of purple whales serenely airlifted over a Scandinavian mountain range signals the arrival of the second album Som En Faldskærm (Like a Parachute) – following debut album By – by Danish trio Hvalfugl (their name formed from two words translating as ‘whale’ and ‘bird’).

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 8 March 2019 and available as CD or digital download at Bandcamp.

 

Jeppe Lavsen electric guitar
Jonathan Fjord Bredholt
piano, harmonium
Anders Juel Bomholt double bass

hvalfugl.dk

Self-released, supported by DMF, Koda Culture and Aarhus Kommune (2019)

REVIEW: ‘Space Jazz’ – Inwardness

THE MEMORY remains vivid of three musicians taking to the stage at 2017’s Manchester Jazz Festival, where an intimate gathering had little or no preconception of what they might experience; and, in many ways, neither had the performers. Inwardness comprises Davy Sur, David Amar, Maciek Pysz – and their vision is to create improvised soundscapes both from and using the space around them.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 11 May 2018 and available from Ozella Music, Amazon, Apple Music, etc.

 

Davy Sur drums, percussion
David Amar soprano saxophone, synthesiser, electronic effects
Maciek Pysz electric guitar, classical guitar, effects

maciekpysz.com/inwardness 
davysur.com/inwardness-music

Ozella Music – OZ085CD (2018)

REVIEW: ‘The Vampires meet Lionel Loueke’ – The Vampires, Lionel Loueke

The Vampires

AUSTRALIAN quartet The Vampires have a good ear for a vamp… and for a key collaborator in respected US-based guitarist/vocalist Lionel Loueke.

Headed up by saxophonist Jeremy Rose and trumpeter Nick Garbett, and driven by the heady rhythms of double bassist Jonathan Zwartz and drummer Danny Fischer (with guest percussionist Alex Masso), this fifth release features Loueke’s distinctive guitar palette of synthy octave-enhanced improvisations and chordal sparkiness, combined with the colourful African vocalisations of his Benin homeland. Rose and Garbett have an affinity with strong melody, rising from the groove of each of their ten original numbers with increasing memorability; and their festal dual-horn lead especially imbues the air with mariachi, reggae, funk, European folk and flavours of Cuba and the Balkans.

So a genuine feel-good album which has long been in the pipeline, it’s myriad influences soon draw the attention and don’t let go. Take Freedom Song, for example, where an Ennio Morricone-style tijuana figure announces and infiltrates an irresistible Police-like reggae pulse, pulled in different directions by Loueke’s quirky modal explorations and bleepy improv, with tenor and trumpet acclamations soaring above. Bendalong, too, ripples and darts with dance-like fervour, yet gear-changes alter the landscape to allow space for Loueke’s characterful blend of guitar and ‘vocal percussion’.

The ebb and flow of rhythm and mood, across fifty-five minutes, is well considered; so lazy, grunging Hard Love (like a beautifully sedated ‘Spanish Flea’) contrasts markedly with the picked African guitar rhythms and side-stepped meanderings in Brand New – the jiving bass ground here is a winner, inspiring salsa celebrations. In Torta Salata, Zwartz’s pliant double bass also sets up a playful partnership with Loueke’s wah-wah fun, as trumpet and sax again eke out a melody that might still be in your head by daybreak; and an ease-back acoustic-styled tribute to Al Green – Green Green Green – somehow keeps a lid on its full-blown Latin potential, resisting a double-time step-up despite its varicoloured interest.

A rare moment of repose is delivered in bass-clarinet-hued Ubud Bubble, said to evoke the time-paused magic and mystery of Gamelan echoes in Bali streets, its smokiness suggested by Fischer’s brushed snare. Suck a Seed‘s attractive African sonorities are pounced on by the increasing clamour of frenetic horn improv and wailing, synthesised guitar; and Endings and Beginnings top and tails with intended softly-breathing ‘circle of life’ continuity.

The Vampires’ music feels visual, thanks to its fabulous grooves and differing atmospheres. In the UK, sight and sound can be experienced in Edinburgh on 13 October 2017, and again on 15 October as the album officially launches at London’s Pizza Express Jazz Club.

The Vampires meet Lionel Loueke is available as CD or digital download at Bandcamp.

 

Jeremy Rose alto sax, tenor sax, bass clarinet
Nick Garbett trumpet
Jonathan Zwartz double bass
Danny Fischer drums
featuring
Lionel Loueke acoustic guitar, electric guitar, vocals
with
Alex Masso drums, cajon, bongos, pandeiro, wood block, cowbells, shakers (tracks 3, 5)

thevampires.com.au

Earshift Music – EAR017 (2017)