‘BIX – A Tribute to Bix Beiderbecke’ – Echoes of Swing (2CD)

bix

AN INVENTIVE PROJECT from Echoes of Swing and guests, this double-CD tribute to early 20th Century cornettist and composer Bix Beiderbecke illuminates the brilliance of his work.

Sample a few bars of the historical mono recordings of Beiderbecke’s own performances with jazz orchestras of the 1920s (the useful reason for the second, complementary, ten-track CD provided in this release), and the sound world of rip-roaring, flapper-style jazz is immediately evoked. But the main feature of BIX (CD1), directed by pianist Bernd Lhotzky, sets out to refashion for a current generation – as well as inspire new compositions – selections from the output of a young American musician (perhaps the Miles Davis of his day) whose genial talent would astound audiences. That was until ill-health – reportedly caused by the pressures of recording and performing, along with persistent alcoholism – resulted in his death, in 1931, at the early age of 28.

The newly-recorded clarity of Beiderbecke favourites is delivered by a core line-up of piano, alto sax, cornet/trumpet and drums, with trombone, guitar double bass and the occasional vocal adding a rich depth of colour. Immediately, new interpretations (rather than carbon copies) pull into focus this music’s relevance, almost a century on; and the fourteen tracks, across a full hour, also include a few surprises – for example, Antônio Carlos Jobim clothed in ’20s attire and a soul bossa groove for period piece Jazz Me Blues. The original, dry mono, clarinet-embellished exuberance of At the Jazz Band Ball is repainted in relaxed swing with great attention to dynamics and balance; I’m Coming Virginia‘s new, Brubeck-styled 5/4 groove is inspired, introducing deliciously shaped vocal and effervescent trombone solo from Shannon Barnett; and Rodgers & Hart’s playful Thou Swell (enjoy the crackly 78rpm with croaky baritone sax) seemingly hits the railroad in alto saxophonist Chris Hopkins’ gently propulsive, chuffing arrangement which intertwines Barnett’s trombone with the cornet of Colin T Dawson.

Bernd Lhotzky’s At Children’s Corner cleverly and sympathetically weaves together themes from Debussy’s piano original (Beiderbecke was a fan of the French composer), with Hopkins’ dreamy alto, between the cakewalking frivolity, a real pleasure. So too is Nix Like Bix, Shannon Barnett’s teasing, swooning trombone-and-bass take on Blue River; and as to the acquaintance of Chris Hopkins’ own The Boy from Davenport with Jobim’s The Girl from Ipanema – well, right there, Bix could be in the mix! I’ll Be a Friend with Pleasure (from the pen of Maceo ‘Sweet Georgia Brown’ Pinkard) invites lyrical crooning from Pete York, and perennial Ol’ Man River (Jerome Kern & Oscar Hammerstein II) briskly captures the mood of the great cornettist’s era with sparkling stride piano from Bernd Lhotzky and a pin-sharp pairing of trumpet and alto sax.

Whether listening to Beiderbecke’s music as an enthusiast, or perhaps approaching from an altogether different angle, Echoes of Swing’s ‘new light through old windows’ is unexpectedly and heartwarmingly delightful (as is the 1927 solo recording of Bix Beiderbecke at the piano which concludes the 2-CD set).

Released on 14 October 2016 and available from ACT MusicAmazon, iTunes, record stores, etc.

Video: The making of BIX – A Tribute to Bix Beiderbecke.

 

CD1
ECHOES OF SWING

Bernd Lhotzky piano, musical director
Chris Hopkins alto saxophone
Colin T Dawson cornet, trumpet
Oliver Mewes drums
with
Shannon Barnett trombone, vocals
Mulo Francel c-melody saxophone, guitar
Pete York drums, percussion, vocals
Henning Gailing double bass
and special guest (on Jazz Me Blues)
Emile Parisien soprano saxophone

CD2
BIX BEIDERBECKE & HIS GANG
(historical mono recordings, 1927)
with Bix Beiderbecke cornet
FRANK TRUMBAUER & HIS ORCHESTRA (historical mono recordings, 1927)
with Bix Beiderbecke cornet
JEAN GOLDKETTE & HIS ORCHESTRA (historical mono recording, 1927)
with Bix Beiderbecke cornet
BIX BEIDERBECKE piano solo, In A Mist (historical mono recording, 1927)

echoes-of-swing.de

ACT Music – ACT 9826-2 (2016)

‘Living Being’ – Vincent Peirani

VincentPeirani

THERE IS something intrinsically Gallic about the sound of the accordion, evoking visions (however hackneyed) of Parisiene walkways or vast Loire Valley vineyards to a bal-musette soundtrack of Émile Vacher – or alternatively, in current musical spheres, the highly regarded and prolific master of that instrument, Richard Galliano.

Breaking the mould in pretty spectacular fashion is the genre-busting accordion artistry of Vincent Peirani. Hailing from Nice, and recently collecting both Prix Django d’Or and ECHO Jazz awards, as well as being voted 2014 Artist of the Year in Jazz Magazine France, his music draws on sounds which have influenced him over the years – classically trained, yet absorbing the diversity of rock, pop, jazz and electronica. Describing the worldwide accessibility of music which brings so much verve and freedom to his own compositions, Peirani says, “For me, this is the future of jazz: today, musicians have access to every conceivable form of music anytime on the Internet. Travelling is easier, so in Paris, as in most other cities, you’ll meet musicians from all around the world. If you are open to exploring new cultures and ideas, this is a goldmine of opportunity!”

The accordionist’s band was created with that multiformity in mind, though all originating from the same home town – Emile Parisien (saxes), Tony Paeleman (Rhodes, effects), Julien Herné (electric bass, effects) and Yoann Serra (drums). And having performed and rehearsed intensely, prior to this recording, it’s evident that they have crystallised their varying career experiences – eg rhythm & blues, hip-hop, pop, jazz, gypsy – into a tight yet exhilaratingly transitional new quintet. Indeed, after much listening, it’s the unpredictability and divergence of these nine numbers (mostly originals) which hold the attention.

Vincent Peirani is clearly an accomplished accordionist, using his instrument to offer sustained walls of sound, rapid ostinati and fluid soloing – and the ability to closely meld his output with the often similar timbres of Tony Paeleman’s Fender Rhodes can be heard in Suite en V, Pt. 1, over which Emile Parisien improvises broadly on soprano sax. Dream Brother swings between accordion wistfulness and driving jazz/rock; and the hallucinatory groove of Mutinerie brings reminiscences of ’70s Soft Machine, complete with echoic effects and tricksy riffs.

Air Song #2‘s powerful melodic intertwining of soprano, accordion and Rhodes ripples to an addictive electronic pulse from Paeleman, Herné and Serra. At almost nine minutes, Some Monk is both spacially and flamboyantly inventive, with a tangible impression of free group improvisation; and Julien Herné’s fabulously mobile electric bass is just one exciting element of fusion-feel Workin’ Rhythm, Yoann Serra’s precise drums combining with Peirani’s complex fingerwork and Paeleman’s joyously gruff Rhodes – priceless.

Released on 9 February 2015, the successful weave of so many strands marks out Living Being as a compelling experience. Further information and audio clips are available at ACT Music.

 

Vincent Peirani accordion, voice
Emile Parisien soprano & tenor saxophones
Tony Paeleman Fender Rhodes, effects
Julien Herné electric bass, effects
Yoann Serra drums

vincent-peirani.com

ACT Music – 9584-2 (2015)