‘Trudi’s Songbook: Volume Two’ – Ruby Rushton

YOU MAY BE LOOKING at that cover and thinking: this, surely, is a re-release of a typically twee 1970s folk singer-songwriter album. But take a listen at Bandcamp, and you’ll discover that Ruby Rushton is actually an inventive, occasionally quirky instrumental sextet delivering a collection of contemporary originals (and a fine Herbie Hancock interpretation) which has at its roots a blend of early jazz fusion and soul, plus a soupçon of Canterbury scene and new-age bohemianism.

Following their 2015 quartet debut Two for Joy, and Trudi’s Songbook: Volume One from earlier this year, the London-based band’s ‘period’ echoes are defined by a delicious blend of timbres and grooves. The pulsating Earth Wind and Fire or Santana redolence of Charlotte Emma Victoria, with bubbling electric bass, drums and percussion, features Edward Cawthorne’s impassioned sax as well as Aidan Shepherd’s clustered electric piano chords and clear synth lines. Cawthorne’s breathy, Roland Kirk-style flute character, too, can be heard in swingin’ organ interlude Together At Last; and the ease-back funk of Trudi’s Mood feels tantalisingly brief.

But Ruby Rushton mainly get their teeth into some fabulously extended episodes (written and arranged by Cawthorne or Cawthorne/Shepherd) which suggest an exciting live experience. Tisbury Truckin‘s gentle aubade evolves into a bass-fizzing groove boasting lively riffs and improvisations, especially from trumpeter Nick Walters (a familiar name on the Manchester jazz scene), all effusively ornamented by the bright, varied percussion of Joseph Deenmamode. Edward Cawthorne’s lithe flute colorations are key to a sound which will resonate with many ‘who were there’ as jazz turned a new corner, yet is also retro-relevant to new ears today. Indeed, the gradually-introduced electric piano and bass riff of Song for Christopher ignites fond memories of Mike Ratledge and Roy Babbington in Soft Machine’s many, seminal recordings – and here, alongside Aidan Shepherd and Fergus Ireland, Eddie Hick is an especially glittering starman as this number widens out with fervour. To close, Herbie Hancock’s cruiser, Butterfly, wraps flute and trumpet improv around smooth grooves and slouchy dubstep playfulness.

Jazz and its interconnected genres currently offer a wealth of under-the-radar brilliance; and on this album, there’s much to discover and enthuse about in what, surprisingly (because it’s so satisfying), is a run-time totalling just 36 minutes… so the perfect spur to then head over to Volume One for more!

Released on 11 November 2017, Trudi’s Songbook: Volume Two is available as CD, vinyl or digital download at Bandcamp.

 

Edward Cawthorne flute, sax
Nick Walters trumpet
Aidan Shepherd keys
Fergus Ireland bass
Joseph Deenmamode percussion
Eddie Hick drums
with
Tom Marriott trombone (on Charlotte Emma Victoria)
Ben Kelly sousaphone (on Charlotte Emma Victoria)

22amusic.bandcamp.com

22a Records – 019 (2107)

Advertisements

‘All In’ – Beats & Pieces Big Band

AllIn

TALK ABOUT Northern soul – these guys have it in three-storey-with-a-mezzanine-shed-loads!

Beats & Pieces Big Band have come a long way in seven years. From their tentative beginnings as Manchester students, through to their early EP and local gigs at Band on the Wall and the Royal Northern College of Music, they have developed a keen following which, on the basis of last year’s blazing Manchester Jazz Festival appearance, is swiftly on the rise. Their excellent 2012 debut album, Big Ideas, turned more than jazz heads, brought Jazz FM and Parliamentary awards, and prompted invitations to perform internationally.

Directed by enthusiastic composer, arranger and instrumentalist Ben Cottrell, and drawing big band comparisons such as Loose Tubes and Matthew Herbert (due to their infectious energy, use of electronics and an unorthodox, contemporary approach), 14-strong Beats & Pieces now release their much-anticipated follow-up, All In – a bristling statement of their current stature. Three powerful banks of three (saxes, trumpets and trombones) are completed by guitar, piano/Rhodes, bass and drums; and buried amongst the irrepressibly slick grooves, their quite-likely uniqueness is characterised by the occasional, endearing whiff of no-nonsense Lancashire colliery band (confirmed by the album’s tailpiece).

Collective influences include Gil Evans, Quincy Jones, Radiohead and Björk… so the resultant six originals and one interpretation (recorded essentially live in the studio) are both dynamic and even entertainingly perplexing. Opener Rocky blasts its way through the first three minutes with all the gritty verve of an extreme, full-throttle movie car chase – raucous and wayward, yet somehow together. Pop hits a relentless, rapid, ‘Can’t Hurry Love’ groove, with Nick Walters’ chattering muted trumpet and Anton Hunter’s guitar riding the swelling, crashing then ebbing wall of horns, whilst Patrick Hurley’s ostinato Rhodes impression of Rain is particularly effective, underpinning tight, reverbed, brassy arrangements before soloing freely.

Ten-minute expanse Havmann (‘the man from the sea’, inspired by Antony Gormley’s statue installation in Mo í Rana, Northern Norway) feels like a new departure; its piercing, semitonal, synth rise-and-fall seems redolent of early Genesis or Robert Fripp, with the icy, spiky urgency of the overlapping extemporisations perhaps echoing the Scandinavian fjords experienced by Cottrell. Originally composed for and workshopped by Norwegian band Ensemble Denada, its impressive slowly-building intensity glints to Graham South’s echoic flugel horn and cinemascope unison trumpets.

Hendo is classic B & P – all solid bass drum, swirling baseline, impudent wah-wah guitar, crescendoing blasts and Sam Healey’s typically flamboyant soprano sax. Revealed a few years ago at an RNCM gig, Ben Cottrell’s sultry New York-style reading of David Bowie’s Let’s Dance finds its place here. A great example of the director’s prowess with arrangements of the unexpected, its lazy demeanour erupts into funky Average White Band euphoria, complete with cheeky, rising James Taylor (Starsky & Hutch) quotation courtesy of Sam Healey’s alto. And so to close, the aforementioned miniature of misty, brass band nostalgia, Fairytale – so beautiful in hymn-like simplicity.

Long may this forward-thinking band continue! All In is released on 8 June 2015, by Efpi Records, and is available here. The album officially launches at Soup Kitchen, Manchester, on 7 July 2015, and at Ronnie Scott’s the following evening.

 

Ben Cottrell director
Anthony Brown, Sam Healey, Ben Watte saxophones
Owen Bryce, Graham South, Nick Walters trumpet
Ed Horsey, Simon Lodge, Rich McVeigh trombone
Anton Hunter guitar
Patrick Hurley piano, Rhodes
Harrison Wood bass
Finlay Panter drums

beatsnpieces.net

Efpi Records – FP022 (2015)

‘Entanglement’ EP – Paradox Ensemble

Paradox

NICK WALTERS’ Manchester-based nonet, Paradox Ensemble, certainly packs a punch thanks to the earthy grooving of trumpet, tenor and alto saxes, sousaphone, trombone, electric bass, drums and piano, as well as the inventive inclusion of accordion and electronics. And this 30-minute four-track EP captures much of the excitement and exuberance of their live jazz performances.

Hitch Slap, building electronically and organically from a single 5/4 sousaphone riff, sets the pace – Walters’ trumpet combining closely with both the tenor sax of Ed Cawthorne and the alto of Tom Harrison to create a powerful front line. The recorded sound is pleasingly close and immediate – Tim Cox’s rasping, echoic trombone soloing adding greater depth – and the brightness of Aidan Shepherd’s agile accordion and the electric piano of Rebecca Nash (with beautifully gyrating electric bass from Paul Michael) contrasts well. The whole ensemble at full tilt creates an intensely strong and original sound… and this is an irresistible opener!

Over a mesmerising, swift 7/8 walking bass, LJM finds Cawthorne’s simple bass clarinet motif shared and elaborated by the horns, Walters soloing on trumpet above the resulting ‘big band’ sound. Once again, the intensity of the forces is impressive, Yussuf Dayes’ solid drumming a key factor in the band’s pulsating energy.

At rhythmic ‘6s and 7s’, Entanglement twines together alto and tenor saxes, whilst accordion also demands a piece of the action (such a pleasing, folky timbre amongst the overall scale and brashness). Retro electric piano, bass and brightly ticking drums create a captivating interlude ahead of the final ‘tousle’.

Finally, Photo 51 showcases the tenor soloing of Ed Cawthorne over Michael’s propulsive 5/4 bass lick. Shepherd’s spiralling accordion, in conjunction with Dayes’ drumming, is a real treat before a triumphant and characteristically cacophonous close!

Nick Walters and his colleagues can be justifiably proud of Paradox – and the enthusiastic reaction to their live shows (as I witnessed at 2013’s Manchester Jazz Festival) is testament to their broad appeal. Meanwhile, fans will await… the album!

For further information on this and other Efpi albums, and to purchase, visit efpirecords.com.


Nick Walters
trumpet, electronics
Tom Harrison alto sax
Ed Cawthorne tenor sax , bass clarinet, vibraphone
Tim Cox trombone
Ben Kelly sousaphone
Aidan Shepherd accordion
Rebecca Nash piano, keyboards
Paul Michael bass
Yussuf Dayes drums

Efpi Records – FP012 (2013)