REVIEW: ‘Portrait: Reflections on Belonging’ – Byron Wallen

DISPLAYING integrity and humanity, respected trumpeter/flugelhornist Byron Wallen’s Portrait – his first recorded release in thirteen years – drew me in at the very first listen… and hasn’t let go yet!

It’s a beautiful concept. Wallen’s original, storytelling compositions are carried on a kaleidoscopic, journeying wave of urban ‘field recordings’ and communal interactions from his native London. In these tarnished days of discrimination and hatred (countered, thankfully, by positive expressions such as #BeKind), it’s worth reading Byron’s heartfelt words… and then responding in gratitude by feeling his and his band’s uplifting, even healing, creativity:

“This album is a meditation and reflection on the powerful impact that music has had on my life. It was conceived whilst sitting in the central square in Woolwich, an area of South East London. I was struck by the community around me with its mixture of cultures and nationalities, from Nepalese elders to young Nigerian men, Somali mothers with their children, a new Eastern European contingent and descendants of families who used to work in the docks and at the Arsenal. Music paved my way to travel and see the world, meeting people from all different cultures and walks of life. The study of music and the process of striving to become a better musician furnished me with a deeper knowledge of self and a gift I could share on so many different levels. In Portrait I am meditating on identity, culture and what it means to belong. The compositions, workshops, performances, and social interaction born out of this project deepened my artistic and personal relationships with the people in my neighbourhood. The album pays tribute to the heart, soul and vibrant provenance of the community I call my home.”

Rising-star guitarist Rob Luft features alongside bassist Paul Michael, drummer Rod Youngs and percussionist Richard ‘Olatunde’ Baker – and together, the leader and his Four Corners band produce a rich swell of vibrant celebration, as well as atmospheres of introspection and reminiscence (sleeve notes provide background to several numbers).

It’s no surprise that Byron Wallen studied with Jon Faddis, Hugh Masekela, George Benson and Chaka Khan; and there’s also a semblance of Freddie Hubbard in his joyful, natural phrases and improvisations. Each For All and All For Each, as an example, presents a warmly-grooving South African vibe, plus a freer sense of looking back; and percussively-driven No Stars No Moon (its title referencing historic racial tensions) features a memorable, chromatic guitar riff supporting Wallen’s almost growling, dual-tracked lead.

Chordal and rhythmic arrangements are tightly executed, Luft usually at the heart, providing agile coloration quite different to that of a keyboard instrument. Reflective moments summon imagery, also – especially the eery, flugelhorn/mouthpiece repetition of Alert (for the workers at the Royal Arsenal) which seemingly pictorialises ships’ horns, seagull cries and gunfire echoing around the docklands of (former) heavy industry. Wallen’s miniatures, such as sweetly-dancing Ferry Shell and bold percussion solo Warren to Arsenal, are tantalisingly brief; and calming Fundamental, with jazz-country pedalled guitar textures, is described as ‘a meditation on what it is to be human’.

The educational aspects of Wallen’s career are fascinatingly woven into the fabric of this album, too, employing the choral exuberance of Plumcroft Primary School, in the heart of Woolwich. Young voices chant ’Spirit of the Ancestors (is calling)’ to a bass-and-drum groove as Wallen bluesily improvises across, connecting to the classes’ examination of family and ancestry; and calypsoing, “soft and squishy” Banana Man (for Bannockburn Primary School) highlights the importance of street markets. Harmonious joy, indeed – something further communicated through gyrating, sunshiny instrumental, Holler.

Byron Wallen tours Portrait in the UK from 2 February to 14 October 2020 – and the album, released on 17 February, is available as CD or download from Bandcamp.

 

Byron Wallen trumpet, flugelhorn, shells, piano, percussion
Rob Luft guitar
Paul Michael bass guitar
Rod Youngs drums
Richard ‘Olatunde’ Baker congas, talking drums
Plumcroft Primary School, classes 3G and 3H vocals

Illustration: Marc Drostle

byronwallen.co.uk

Twilight Jaguar Recordings – TJCD3 (2020)

RECENT LISTENING: January 2020 (2)

Portrait: Reflections on Belonging – Byron Wallen
Byron Wallen, Rob Luft, Paul Michael, Rod Youngs, Richard ‘Olatunde’ Baker
with Plumcroft Primary School
Release date: 17 February 2020 (Twilight Jaguar Recordings)
byronwallen.co.uk

Black and White, Vol. 1 – Julia Biel
Julia Biel – solo piano
Release date: 28 February 2020 (Rokit Records/Ankhtone Records)
juliabiel.bandcamp.com

Multiverse – Jim Hart & Ivo Neame
Jim Hart, Ivo Neame
Release date: 21 February 2020 (Edition Records)
jimhartivoneame.bandcamp.com

Rainbow Over Kolonaki – Talinka
Tali Atzmon, Gilad Atzmon, Jenny Bliss, Yaron Stavi
with Ross Stanley, Billy Pod
Release date: 25 January 2020 (Fanfare Records / Birnam)
birnamcdshop.com / gilad.online

Broken Circles – Jure Pukl
Jure Pukl, Charles Altura, Joel Ross, Matt Brewer, Kweku Sumbry
Release date: 21 February 2020 (Whirlwind Recordings)
jurepukl.bandcamp.com

Imploding Stars – Hervé Perez
Hervé Perez
Release date: 3 May 2019 (Focused Silence)
focusedsilence.bandcamp.com

‘Entanglement’ EP – Paradox Ensemble

Paradox

NICK WALTERS’ Manchester-based nonet, Paradox Ensemble, certainly packs a punch thanks to the earthy grooving of trumpet, tenor and alto saxes, sousaphone, trombone, electric bass, drums and piano, as well as the inventive inclusion of accordion and electronics. And this 30-minute four-track EP captures much of the excitement and exuberance of their live jazz performances.

Hitch Slap, building electronically and organically from a single 5/4 sousaphone riff, sets the pace – Walters’ trumpet combining closely with both the tenor sax of Ed Cawthorne and the alto of Tom Harrison to create a powerful front line. The recorded sound is pleasingly close and immediate – Tim Cox’s rasping, echoic trombone soloing adding greater depth – and the brightness of Aidan Shepherd’s agile accordion and the electric piano of Rebecca Nash (with beautifully gyrating electric bass from Paul Michael) contrasts well. The whole ensemble at full tilt creates an intensely strong and original sound… and this is an irresistible opener!

Over a mesmerising, swift 7/8 walking bass, LJM finds Cawthorne’s simple bass clarinet motif shared and elaborated by the horns, Walters soloing on trumpet above the resulting ‘big band’ sound. Once again, the intensity of the forces is impressive, Yussuf Dayes’ solid drumming a key factor in the band’s pulsating energy.

At rhythmic ‘6s and 7s’, Entanglement twines together alto and tenor saxes, whilst accordion also demands a piece of the action (such a pleasing, folky timbre amongst the overall scale and brashness). Retro electric piano, bass and brightly ticking drums create a captivating interlude ahead of the final ‘tousle’.

Finally, Photo 51 showcases the tenor soloing of Ed Cawthorne over Michael’s propulsive 5/4 bass lick. Shepherd’s spiralling accordion, in conjunction with Dayes’ drumming, is a real treat before a triumphant and characteristically cacophonous close!

Nick Walters and his colleagues can be justifiably proud of Paradox – and the enthusiastic reaction to their live shows (as I witnessed at 2013’s Manchester Jazz Festival) is testament to their broad appeal. Meanwhile, fans will await… the album!

For further information on this and other Efpi albums, and to purchase, visit efpirecords.com.


Nick Walters
trumpet, electronics
Tom Harrison alto sax
Ed Cawthorne tenor sax , bass clarinet, vibraphone
Tim Cox trombone
Ben Kelly sousaphone
Aidan Shepherd accordion
Rebecca Nash piano, keyboards
Paul Michael bass
Yussuf Dayes drums

Efpi Records – FP012 (2013)