‘Double Trouble Live’ – Peter Ehwald

PeterEhwald

THERE’S an enticingly gritty, direct edginess to new album Double Trouble Live from German saxophonist Peter Ehwald.

A quartet by any other name, this ‘double double bass’ backbone of Robert Landfermann and Andreas Lang ensures a robust, hard-hitting edge to Ehwald’s original compositions (plus one arrangement), with drummer/percussionist Jonas Burgwinkel a particularly agile contributor to these nine tracks recorded at gigs in Düsseldorf, München and Potsdam in 2013/2014. Peter Ehwald is already known to UK ears as the melodic front lead to exciting quartet Paragon (with Jon Scott, Arthur Lea and Matthias Nowak) – but this line-up is different again, revelling in more raucous, edgy, free improvisation whilst also able to display contrasting openness and sensitivity.

Despite the potential of eight bass strings, the sound remains essentially that of a chordless trio (recalling the sound worlds of, say, Depart or Partikel). Nevertheless, there’s a spontaneity to the exploratory jazz semblance of this quartet – formed in 2010, with a 2013 studio album to their name – which suggests a promising live experience, the leader describing his intentions “to act out something wild and create beautiful sounds at the same time; warm, contrapuntal, free indeed and liberated, yet still thoroughly composed.”

Peter Ehwald is a particularly searching saxophonist, and very much upfront in these performances. Lurching, sinewy, arco basses support his relentless tenor tumblings and screeches in opener In the Zone; and Mimouna‘s soprano extemporisations (on a traditional tune) portray the quartet quite differently with shades of Jan Garbarek or Julian Arguëlles, plus ear-catching, percussive bubbling from Ehwald’s personnel. As live takes, there’s an engaging honesty to these recordings, Mr Soju (at almost nine minutes) hitting the walls and rebounding to the quick-fire staccato of Burgwinkel’s hard kit and Ehwald’s unyielding, gruff and often duo-toned perambulations.

Dreamband is especially colourful, Ehwald’s showy tenor deftly combining with impulsive, buoyant bass and sparky percussion. Disquieting Branded brings the impressive bass voices to the fore, with Ehwald’s soprano suggesting a Shorteresque kind of discovery; title track Double Trouble resounds to Ehwald’s unexpectedly Getzian tones and the eastern resonances of Landfermann and Lang; and Borden‘s audacity – Ehwald clearly on great tenor form – is elevated still higher by Jonas Burgwinkel’s firecracker drums and percussion.

Arguably, as a recorded-live account, this amalgamation of sets requires close attention to understand its detail (certainly not mainstream or background listening). But once ‘in’, there’s a depth of invention here which, to ears attuned to saxophone-led chordless ensembles, can become absorbing.

Released on 30 October 2015, with its launch at London Jazz Festival on 18 November, Double Trouble Live is available from Peter Ehwald’s website, and also at online store MDT.

 

Peter Ehwald tenor and soprano saxophones
Robert Landfermann double bass
Andreas Lang double bass
Jonas Burgwinkel drums

peter-ehwald.net

Jazzwerkstatt – JW164 (2015)

‘Layer Cake’ – Jeff Herr Corporation

JeffHerr

LUXEMBOURG DRUMMER Jeff Herr’s Corporation has been in existence for some twelve years, though only since 2012 in this energetic acoustic trio format with saxophonist Maxime Bender and double bassist Laurent Payfert.

Read the full review at LondonJazz News…


Jeff Herr
drums
Laurent Payfert bass
Maxime Bender saxophones

jeff-herr.com

Igloo Records – IGL 259 (2014)

‘All In’ – Beats & Pieces Big Band

AllIn

TALK ABOUT Northern soul – these guys have it in three-storey-with-a-mezzanine-shed-loads!

Beats & Pieces Big Band have come a long way in seven years. From their tentative beginnings as Manchester students, through to their early EP and local gigs at Band on the Wall and the Royal Northern College of Music, they have developed a keen following which, on the basis of last year’s blazing Manchester Jazz Festival appearance, is swiftly on the rise. Their excellent 2012 debut album, Big Ideas, turned more than jazz heads, brought Jazz FM and Parliamentary awards, and prompted invitations to perform internationally.

Directed by enthusiastic composer, arranger and instrumentalist Ben Cottrell, and drawing big band comparisons such as Loose Tubes and Matthew Herbert (due to their infectious energy, use of electronics and an unorthodox, contemporary approach), 14-strong Beats & Pieces now release their much-anticipated follow-up, All In – a bristling statement of their current stature. Three powerful banks of three (saxes, trumpets and trombones) are completed by guitar, piano/Rhodes, bass and drums; and buried amongst the irrepressibly slick grooves, their quite-likely uniqueness is characterised by the occasional, endearing whiff of no-nonsense Lancashire colliery band (confirmed by the album’s tailpiece).

Collective influences include Gil Evans, Quincy Jones, Radiohead and Björk… so the resultant six originals and one interpretation (recorded essentially live in the studio) are both dynamic and even entertainingly perplexing. Opener Rocky blasts its way through the first three minutes with all the gritty verve of an extreme, full-throttle movie car chase – raucous and wayward, yet somehow together. Pop hits a relentless, rapid, ‘Can’t Hurry Love’ groove, with Nick Walters’ chattering muted trumpet and Anton Hunter’s guitar riding the swelling, crashing then ebbing wall of horns, whilst Patrick Hurley’s ostinato Rhodes impression of Rain is particularly effective, underpinning tight, reverbed, brassy arrangements before soloing freely.

Ten-minute expanse Havmann (‘the man from the sea’, inspired by Antony Gormley’s statue installation in Mo í Rana, Northern Norway) feels like a new departure; its piercing, semitonal, synth rise-and-fall seems redolent of early Genesis or Robert Fripp, with the icy, spiky urgency of the overlapping extemporisations perhaps echoing the Scandinavian fjords experienced by Cottrell. Originally composed for and workshopped by Norwegian band Ensemble Denada, its impressive slowly-building intensity glints to Graham South’s echoic flugel horn and cinemascope unison trumpets.

Hendo is classic B & P – all solid bass drum, swirling baseline, impudent wah-wah guitar, crescendoing blasts and Sam Healey’s typically flamboyant soprano sax. Revealed a few years ago at an RNCM gig, Ben Cottrell’s sultry New York-style reading of David Bowie’s Let’s Dance finds its place here. A great example of the director’s prowess with arrangements of the unexpected, its lazy demeanour erupts into funky Average White Band euphoria, complete with cheeky, rising James Taylor (Starsky & Hutch) quotation courtesy of Sam Healey’s alto. And so to close, the aforementioned miniature of misty, brass band nostalgia, Fairytale – so beautiful in hymn-like simplicity.

Long may this forward-thinking band continue! All In is released on 8 June 2015, by Efpi Records, and is available here. The album officially launches at Soup Kitchen, Manchester, on 7 July 2015, and at Ronnie Scott’s the following evening.

 

Ben Cottrell director
Anthony Brown, Sam Healey, Ben Watte saxophones
Owen Bryce, Graham South, Nick Walters trumpet
Ed Horsey, Simon Lodge, Rich McVeigh trombone
Anton Hunter guitar
Patrick Hurley piano, Rhodes
Harrison Wood bass
Finlay Panter drums

beatsnpieces.net

Efpi Records – FP022 (2015)