‘Under the Moon’ – Blue-Eyed Hawk

UnderTheMoon

THIS IS UNDOUBTEDLY one of the most original and unusual releases of the year from a quartet of jazz artists. Exploring literary themes and moving effortlessly between contemporary jazz, rock, punk and folk, Blue-Eyed Hawk is a concept which, on paper, might easily have fallen from the sky, never to be seen again. Yet, after a few weeks of listening, I confirm that its pure inventiveness, matched with unequivocal musicality, marks out Under the Moon as a ‘must-hear’ debut.

The collaborators here are already establishing themselves as familiar faces on the British jazz scene: vocalist Lauren Kinsella, trumpeter Laura Jurd, guitarist Alex Roth and drummer Corrie Dick. But the vision for this album of eleven originals – in which all share compositional credits, taking inspiration from poets including W B Yeats* and Seamus Heaney – is genuinely alluring in its cross-genre approach.

For a start, wave goodbye to all cosy thoughts of Dorothy, the Tin Man and Toto in Kinsella’s thrashing, punkish re-imagining of Somewhere (aka Somewhere over the Rainbow from much-loved 1930s movie The Wizard of Oz). The initial response might be that this is bizarre and inexplicable… but then, does creative art need to explain itself, particularly when the outcome is so compelling? Pairing the familiar Edgar Harburg lyric with a new melody based on a South Indian raga (heard by Kinsella in Bangalore), it rocks out to Roth’s overdriven guitar and Dick’s heavy, intense drumming, enhanced by the fantastic echoic yelps and blistering, flutter-tongued soloing of Jurd’s trumpet. The unique style range of Kinsella’s vocalisations is displayed here – a fascinating blend of melodic finesse, dramatic mystery, nonsense/baby talk (as if speaking in tongues) and electronic repetition – ‘has to be heard! And a tailpiece nod to Harold Arlen’s original melody reassures anyone frazzled by the whole wonderful experience.

Kinsella’s own Oyster Trails features her strong, mystically-presented lyric in a new-age/jazz-folk setting (the search for a genre definition possibly akin to those early steps made by the late ’60s/early ’70s Canterbury scene pioneers – and happily so). Jurd improvises brightly, whilst sensitive vocal harmonies and synths further enhance the magic. Alex Roth’s simple, folksy Aurora 5AM is entrancing, its gentle hummed melody over acoustic guitar and birdsong followed through by Kinsella’s lyrical vocals, and the mellowness of Jurd’s flugel-like extemporisations concluding with mesmeric, canonic overlays. This quartet’s ability to blend together songs of differing styles is apparent, as they launch into the four-square pop/rock of Spiderton; and then there’s O Do Not Love Too Long – a serene, misty folksong which ebbs and flows around Kinsella’s beguiling voice (“…do not love too long, or you’ll grow out of fashion, like an old song”) and is exquisitely detailed in its varied instrumentation.

The curious, bewitching nonsense language of Kinsella’s vocals colours Reflections on a Spiral, inspired by 19th c. French poet Armand Silvestre; and, once again, a rapid gear change into Jurd’s American Punk/Bowie-esque Living in the Fast Lane, Kinsella relishing its high tempo. In stark contrast, the wheezy pedalling of Corrie Dick’s harmonium, in conjunction with his solid drumming, characterises Intro (For Fathers), a bizarre, layered ‘mediaeval rock’ episode reminiscent of Mike Oldfield’s early outpourings; and then another of Dick’s compositions, For Tom and Everything, pitches Kinsella’s yearning lyric against picked guitar and hymn-like trumpet.

Try to Turn Back raises a smile with its unashamed, easy-going, countrified hook. With all that’s gone before, it shouldn’t gel – but, somehow they have it covered as Jurd improvises out through an upward-spiralling synth wash. To close, the plain, creaking piano of Corrie Dick accompanies Lauren Kinsella’s lyrical interpretation of the late Seamus Heaney’s poignant words in ‘Valediction’, Jurd adding a plaintive trumpet line before a gently ticking guitar rhythm accompanies its affecting choral fade-out.

Released on 15 September 2014, and available as CD or digital download at Edition Records’ Bandcamp store, the improvisatory qualities of this album might suggest ‘jazz’… but, then, it’s unlike anything I’ve heard before! They’re currently touring and will appear at the EFG London Jazz Festival on 23 November.

Under the Moon…… that’s where you’ll find me.

 

Lauren Kinsella voice
Laura Jurd trumpet, synth, voice
Alex Roth guitar, effects, synths, voice
Corrie Dick drums, percussion, harmonium, piano, voice
with
Tom Herbert additional bass and synth

blue-eyedhawk.com

*The name ‘Blue-Eyed Hawk’ originates from a line in W B Yeats’ poem, ‘Under the Moon’.

Edition Records – EDN1054 (2014)

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‘Dreamland’ – Elliot Galvin Trio

Dreamland

THE JANGLING TOY PIANO offers a clue. From its impudent, clumsy, pealing intro to this Elliot Galvin Trio debut release, gradually disintegrating into an outrageous, messy sprawl before first track, Ism, finds its rhythmic feet, it becomes clear that this is no ordinary piano trio. In fact, the players – Elliot Galvin (piano), Tom McCredie (bass) and Simon Roth (drums) – appear to be redefining the genre.

Read the full review at LondonJazz News…


Elliot Galvin
piano, toy piano
Tom McCredie double bass
Simon Roth drum kit

Chaos Collective – CC003 (2014)

elliotgalvin.com
chaos-collective.com

‘Grigio’ – Francesco Turrisi

Image

GRIGIO by name and understated cover art, but colourfully overflowing in atmosphere, musicality and originality, this eclectic release by Italian-born Dublin-based Francesco Turrisi celebrates and interprets the varied hues of Irish, Italian and Hebrew music.

Pianist and composer/arranger Turrisi assuredly directs this diverse collection, encouraging both close ensemble playing and individuality from his outstanding instrumentalists – Nick Roth (soprano sax), Kate Ellis (cello), Dan Bodwell (bass) and Sean Carpio (drums), plus guest Zohar Fresco (frame drums, percussion and additional vocals). The gleaming, crowning jewels in this project are two contrasting vocalists – Irish traditional singer Róisín Elsafty and multi-genre songstress Clara Sanabras – each bringing their particular warmth and character to the songs contained within the ten-track album.

Advancing straight to Turrisi’s title composition, Grigio, one immediately senses the subtlety and invention to be discovered here. Over a slow, mysterious piano ostinato (vaguely reminiscent of Soft Machine’s ‘The Tale of Taliesin’ from way-back-when), the mesmeric weaving of closely-toned cello and sax combined with expressive drums/percussion creates an arresting, spatial soundscape. John Zorn’s Hadasha employs similar patterns (though with a different, more upbeat hook) to coax the most striking guttural, hard-blown screechings and complex percussive improvisations to Turrisi’s ground bass and bright internal piano-string tracery. Indeed, the instrumental explorations are such that, frequently, it is difficult to discern the origins of the unusual blends of sound, making the experience all the more compelling.

Che si può fare introduces the sumptuously-ornamented voice of Clara Sanabras, bringing a special kind of theatre to the Italianate descending-bass motif of the piano trio (Turrisi, Bodwell, Carpio) – beautifully expressive throughout. The ingeniously long, sustained, overlapping EBow/piano technique demonstrated in traditional Irish tune Eleanór a rún creates an ethereal canvas for the pure, crystal-clear folk singing of Róisín Elsafty, as if ebbing and flowing beneath the calm of early morning mists. Elsafty’s diction and phrasing are magical… time seeming to stand still for these all-too-brief six minutes.

Nick Roth’s reverential arrangement of traditional Hebrew melody Maoz tsur, featuring his lachrymose soprano sax embellishments and Fresco’s synagogue-suggested wordless vocals over piano, cello and frame drums, lead to an ancient Irish lament, Síle Bheag Ní Chonnallainí, Turrisi providing sensitive piano accompaniment to Elsafty’s beguiling lyricism. Clara Sanabras illuminates early baroque composer Tarquinio Merula’s Canzonetta spirituale sopra la nanna, Bodwell’s repeated flexing bass a key element; and Sanabras’ voice also animates a Stefano Landi madrigal, Augellin, the leader offering considerable pianistic impetus as well as considered, deliberate soloing.

The rhythmically gentle motif of Turrisi’s own Tu ridi repeats with finely balanced piano, cello, voice and sax, though also surprises with some satisfyingly unexpected harmonic turns. Concluding, Róisín Elsafty’s reassuring, hushed vocal to Gaelic lullaby Seothin seó is quietly enhanced by Francesco Turrisi’s so-delicate pianistic ‘rocking’… bringing a particularly touching eventide glow to a recording of genuine beauty and refinement.

Launching in the UK at The Vortex, London, on 10 February 2014, followed by UK release on 24 February, ‘Grigio’ is available from Diatribe Records, Ireland’s foremost record label for new music.


Francesco Turrisi
piano, EBows
Nick Roth soprano saxophone
Kate Ellis cello
Dan Bodwell double bass
Sean Carpio drums

Special guests
Clara Sanabras vocals
Róisín Elsafty vocals
Zohar Fresco frame drums, percussion, vocals

Diatribe – DIACD015 (2013)

Diatribe.ie
francescoturrisi.com

‘meets I Dig Monk, Tuned’ – ReDiviDeR

Redivider

AN INTRIGUING and, ultimately, satisfying second album from experimental Irish four-piece, ReDiviDeR, led by drummer and composer Matthew Jacobson.

The chordless (and palindromic) quartet have frequently trodden the festival trail of their homeland with an interesting mix of textures, grooves and samples, all melded by an innate jazz sensibility played out on alto sax, trombone, bass and drums. Citing such influences as Thelonius Monk, Charles Mingus and Tim Berne, this latest release reveals their sharp creativity to a wider audience. And, if your ears are responsive (as well as eyes open to one or two track/guest-name japes – though my guess is the ‘AleX’s were an anagram too far!), there is much here to savour. Following up 2012 debut ‘Never odd or eveN’, they are found here in collaborative vein as four established UK jazz musicians guest on tracks written specifically with them in mind (the anagram of ‘United Kingdom’ as album title ‘I Dig Monk, Tuned’ far too clever for me!).

Leaping straight to the centrepoint of the seven tracks (a couple of which are brief interludes), Bin Saved begins with a compelling descending pattern over which a resonant fretless electric bass with trombone, plus alto embellishment, invites guest cellist Ben Davis to improvise impassionedly into a solo spotlight. Nick Roth’s alto then takes the piece on a new, raunchier route, Davis and Derek Whyte sharing the rocky bassline, Jacobson snapping cleanly on drums. Concluding with mellower, more echoic trombone and bass, it’s quite a number!

Opener, Twin Kodes, features the now-almost-trademark abstract Rhodes wizardry of Kit Downes, followed by effective, trippy, post-produced trombone from Colm O’Hara; then… a twist into Downes’ ‘Troyka’ territory and a random-yet-structured trombone/sax dash to the finish. Animal Code sees Alex Bonney’s trumpet beefing-up the horns, a wild elephantine cacophony ensuing over stampeding drums and electronics.

The guitar of Alex Roth brings an altogether different timbre to Velvet Pouch, a dark, smouldering track of repeated riffs and effects against an intensifying bass and drum groove whilst, finally, May I Agree‘s semitone-clustered, cascading horn melodies tumble along to Jacobson’s pointed, snare-driven rhythm.

As members of touring initiative Match & Fuse, it’s easy to understand why ReDiViDeR are a popular live act – check out the links below for further information.


Matthew Jacobson
drums  matthewjacobsonmusic.com
Derek Whyte bass
Nick Roth alto sax
Colm O’Hara trombone
with
Kit Downes keys
Alex Roth guitar
Alex Bonney trumpet/electronics
Ben Davis cello

ReDiviDeR
Diatribe
Match & Fuse

Diatribe – DIACD016 (2013)

‘Engines of Creation’ – Phil Meadows Group

Engines

TALK ABOUT setting the bar high with a debut release! A lot of fun was had during the recording of Phil Meadows Group’s ‘Engines of Creation’. I wasn’t there… I wasn’t involved… but I just know from the impassioned and entertaining performances here!

Saxophonist/composer Phil Meadows already has quite a pedigree (NYJO lead alto, performances at the BBC Proms and Ronnie Scott’s, collaborations with Tim Garland, Jason Yarde, and so on), and now focuses on realising his own material with a first-class team of musicians – Laura Jurd (trumpet), Elliot Galvin (piano and Fender Rhodes), Conor Chaplin (upright and electric bass) and Simon Roth (drums).

What sets this fine programme of seven new compositions apart, for me, can be defined as originality, multiformity and ambition. There is a oneness amongst these musicians, a great understanding between them which manifests itself both in the differing, tightly-scored sections of their output and in the dauntless improvisation this quintet is prepared to risk… and win!

Opener ‘Fin’ immediately grabs the attention with an audacious alto fanfare from Meadows, leading straight to a catchy groove in which he and Laura Jurd instantly demonstrate their impressive close-mindedness. Elliot Galvin begins to show his uninhibited approach to piano, soloing imaginatively and sparkily – a joy to hear. ‘Moving On’ is a slick number, with both horn players in parallel as well as exhibiting their obvious solo talents. Changing tack with a more electronic approach, ‘Runner’ (a swipe at the frustrations of the South Circular’s regular gridlock) sees Chaplin, Roth and Galvin establish a funky groove resembling some Stanley Clarke / Billy Cobham / Mike Ratledge dream team! And, over this retro electric bass and Rhodes fusion (with Roth putting in some great hard-hitting percussion), Meadows and Jurd produce a sparkling display of soloing and interplay. I could listen for hours to discover where they take this!

Title track ‘Engines of Creation’, paying homage to those who inspired this recording, initially deceives with its straightforward opening, only to disintegrate into wonderful piano and drums freefall (complete with breaking glass?)! But somehow, amongst this abandon, I still perceive a connectivity which eventually slides back into a stronger quintet finish. ‘Flamingos’ showcases Elliot Galvin’s pianistic brilliance with explorations inside the piano as well as some delightful, adventurous keys work; and Meadows and Jurd combine to build the piece into certain triumphal grandeur.

Taking its motivation from Phil Meadows’ experience of a less-than-willing pub landlord, ‘Dragon of George’ again picks up the more jazz/rock approach with an exciting and complex rhythmical drive, led pulsatingly by Chaplin on electric bass. Galvin again gives his all, encouraging soprano sax and trumpet to join in the ‘angst’! It’s infectious stuff which, I suspect, might well be a live showstopper. ‘Captain Kirk’, with dainty piano and bass opening, develops into a satisfying ‘curtain call’ for the whole band, Meadows and Jurd again soloing fluently above a confident piano, bass and drums backdrop.

The Phil Meadows Group (supported by Jazz Services) has recently toured this new release, with more gigs anticipated soon, including 29 September at The Vortex. I hope Phil and this band enjoy a long future together, as here is a quintet which most definitely shows great enthusiasm and desire to ‘push the envelope’ with contemporary jazz.

Splendidly produced by new UK independent label and collective, Boom Better Records.


Phil Meadows
 saxophones
Laura Jurd  trumpet
Elliot Galvin  piano and Fender Rhodes
Conor Chaplin  upright and electric bass
Simon Roth  drums

http://www.philmeadowsmusic.co.uk
http://boombetter.com/

Boom Better Records – BOOM 006 CD (2013)