REVIEW: ‘Wes Reimagined’ – Nigel Price Organ Trio

ONE OF THE GREAT, industrious and entertaining characters of British jazz – a champion of UK festivals, drawing on years of performing experience and winning hefty appreciation on the live circuit – electric guitarist Nigel Price’s musical passion, versatility and technical expertise are a true delight.

His excellent contrafact organ trio double albums of 2011 and 2016, Heads & Tales, showcase his invention in reworking jazz standards (Volume 2 is especially recommended). Now, he specifically turns his attention to the music of influential American guitarist Wes Montgomery (1923–1968), confirming himself a fan, particularly as Montgomery’s compositions are “great vehicles for improvisation, especially used in the organ trio format”.

Alongside Price’s core line-up of B3 Hammond organist Ross Stanley and drummer Joel Barford, he also welcomes saxophonists Vasilis Xenopoulos (tenor) and Tony Kofi (alto) who provide joyous horn textures and fervid soloing that reflect their particular characters, their mid-registers nicely attuned. Further complementing the sound is returning percussionist Snowboy; and the Phonograph Effect Strings, with fine arrangements by trombonist Callum Au, occasionally underpin with an elegant, soft sheen.

In the spirit of those earlier releases, Price’s homage – Wes Reimagined – respectfully looks afresh at eight of the Indianapolis-born guitarist’s works, plus two interpretations, respectively, of Monk Montgomery (Wes’s bassist brother) and Frederick Loewe (famously, Lerner and Loewe). And what a joyous celebration! Over a full hour, these tunes are respectfully reworked (“just a kind of ‘what if?’… if Wes had been in alternative frame of mind that day”); and, of course, they’re centred around the organ trio structure. Cariba!’s original bossa pace, for example, translates into Barford’s irresistibly cool slouch, Stanley’s offbeat chords supporting an exchange of lithe guitar and sax solos across preening strings, while familiar, ease-back Leila becomes an amiable fast swing of rippling improvisation.

Perky Jingles sambas with a great energy, thanks to Snowboy’s congas (including whistle-announced solo spot), its sense of fun also tangible in a vibrant reading of Monk’s Shop (Monk Montgomery). Far Wes’s usually straight promenade now elegantly waltzes to Price’s glistening extemporisations and, similarly, scampering So Do It! is refashioned as a lush, relaxed bolero, shimmering with the Phonograph Effect Strings’ airy grace. The cheery bliss of these reimaginings is equalled, throughout, by the band’s textural possibilities, along with some audacious, rhythmic twists. Just catch the new, strutting funk of Movin’ Along, Xenopoulos’s flowing tenor in the snappy boogaloo of Twisted Blues or the punchier groove of Road Song to get a feel for the validity of the project. In the latter, Price (not for the only time) nods to the characteristic, sunny octaves of Montgomery’s playing while Stanley’s soloing is, as ever, supported by his seemingly effortless bass pedalling – this is pure, contemporary organ trio, and it shuffles magnificently,

Recorded by Wes Montgomery, I’ve Grown Accustomed To Her Face (Frederick Loewe) provides the most gorgeous, wistful endpiece to this sequence as Nigel Price’s open, balladic guitar style becomes gradually infused with the sensitive, yet crunchy swell and ebb of Ross Stanley’s Hammond (with a beautiful solo tone), and the Phonograph’s tremulant strings add more than a dash of movie-like nostalgia.

Contextually, here is a recording which is as good as anything you’ll hear from the golden late-1950s and 1960s era of organ trios, but bolstered by the frontline pizzazz of double saxes and more. Enrich your library with the full, retro-styled CD package – rather than the superficial gratification of streaming or downloading (then mislaying) a random track – as this album might well be your summer-long vibe!

Released on 4 June 2021, Wes Reimagined is available from nigethejazzer.com, Amazon, etc.

 

Nigel Price guitar
Ross Stanley B3 Hammond organ
Joel Barford drums
with
Vasilis Xenopoulos tenor saxophone
Tony Kofi alto saxophone
Snowboy congas, bongos, surdo, shekere, whistle
Callum Au trombone, string arrangements
and
Phonograph Effect Strings:
Kay Stephen
violin 1
Anna Brigham violin 2
Elitsa Bogdanova viola
Chris Terepin cello

nigethejazzer.com

Ubuntu Music – UBU0080 (2021)

REVIEW: ‘After The Real Thing’ – Roy Mor

THE EVOCATIVE STRAINS of the oud were the immediate allure of this attractive debut recording, as leader, by Israeli pianist Roy Mor.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 21 May 2021 at Ubuntu Music and available from Proper Music, Amazon, etc.

 

Roy Mor piano, Fender Rhodes
with
Amos Hoffman oud, guitar
Myles Sloniker bass
Itay Morchi drums
Davy Lazar flugelhorn
Marty Kenney bass
Peter Traunmueller drums
Joel Kruzic bass
Jeremy Dutton drums

roymormusic.com

Ubuntu Music – UBU0081 (2021)

REVIEW: ‘Tales from the Punjab’ – Shez Raja

A SULTRY SUN silhouetting Badshahi Mosque and the Samadhi of Ranjit Singh in the cosmopolitan city of Lahore, Punjab, signals a quite different project from Wirral-born, London-based electric bassist Shez Raja.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released 19 March 2021 at Ubuntu Music and available from Shez Raja’s website, Amazon, Apple Music, etc.

 

Shez Raja bass guitar
Fiza Haider vocals
Ahsan Papu bansuri
Zohaib Hassan sarangi
Kashif Ali Dani tabla
Qamar Abbas cajon

shezraja.com

Ubuntu Music – UBU0077 (2021)

REVIEW: ‘Quietly There’ – Allison Neale

A RELEASE to make the heart leap, alto saxophonist Allison Neale’s Quietly There summons so many early jazz memories, especially the soft, balmy tone of Paul Desmond and the mellifluous (tenor) phrasing of Stan Getz.

Read my full review at LondonJazz News…

Released on 11 September 2020 and available from Proper Music, Amazon, Apple Music.

 

Allison Neale alto saxophone
Peter Bernstein electric guitar
Dave Green double bass
Steve Brown drums

allisonneale.com

Ubuntu Music – UBU0062 (2020)

REVIEW: ‘Configuration’ – John Law’s Congregation

IT’S A PRIVILEGE to track the evolution of a musician’s career over many years, especially when, like pianist John Law’s, it simply goes from strength to strength. I first saw him perform at Brecon Jazz Festival in 2007 (the Art of Sound Trio with Yuri Goloubev and Asaf Sirkis); and, since then, through his solo and various Congregation ensemble albums, there’s been a clear sense of continual experimentation.

Read my full review at LondonJazzNews…

Released on 1 May 2020 on the Ubuntu Music label, Configuration is available directly from John Law’s website, Amazon and Apple Music.

 

John Law piano, keyboards, samples
James Mainwaring saxophones, guitar, electronics
Ashley John Long double bass
Billy Weir drums
with
Jasper Law electronics

johnlaw.org.uk

Ubuntu Music – UBU0036 (2020)

RECENT LISTENING: April 2020 (3)

Another Kind of Soul – Tony Kofi
Tony Kofi, Andy Davies, Alex Webb, Andrew Cleyndert, Alfonso Vitale
Release date: 24 April 2020 (The Last Music Company)
lastmusic.co.uk / propermusic.com / amazon.co.uk

Configuration – John Law’s Congregation
John Law, James Mainwaring, Ashley John Long, Billy Weir, Jasper Law
Release date: 1 May 2020 (Ubuntu Music)
www.amazon.co.uk / music.apple.com

Totem – Ferdinando Romano
Ralph Alessi, Tommaso Iacoviello, Simone Alessandrini, Nazareno Caputo, Manuel Magrini, Ferdinando Romano, Giovanni Paolo Liguori
Release date: 24 April 2020 (Losen Records)
ferdinandoromano.bandcamp.com

A Million Conversations – Rachel Sutton
Rachel Sutton, Roland Perrin, Michael Curtis Ruiz, Paul Robinson, Stuart Brooks
Release date: 13 January 2020 (33Jazz Records)
rachelsuttonmusic.com / 33jazz.com / music.apple.com

Music of our Times – Gary Husband & Markus Reuter
Gary Husband, Markus Reuter
Release date: 26 March 2020 (MoonJune Records)
markus-reuter-moonjune.bandcamp.com

Live at Ucheldre – Huw Warren
Huw Warren – solo piano
Release date: 10 April 2020
huwwarren.bandcamp.com