‘Known-Unknown’ – Trichotomy

Trichotomy

THE TRICHOTOMOUS CHARACTERISTICS of this established Australian piano trio are defined as captivating melody, rhythmic interplay and emotive collective improvisation. 

That’s a pretty challenging set of values to live up to, yet pianist Sean Foran, bassist Samuel Vincent and drummer John Parker are master explorers of this traditional and particularly exposed of instrumental line-ups. Indeed, Trichotomy’s fifth album Known-Unknown (following 2013’s more widely collaborative Fact Finding Mission) is anything but a walk in the park. Having been together some eighteen years, they’ve rubbed stylistic shoulders with Avishai Cohen, Phronesis, E.S.T. and a raft of other contemporary bands seeking a musically democratic outlook – but any similarity which might have been considered the ‘elephant in the room’ is politely ushered out of the large side door. Why? Because Foran, Vincent and Parker possess the empathy and desire to keep forging their own identity; and any momentary flickers of the aforementioned (coincidental or otherwise, and often involving judicious electronics) simply raise a smile of acknowledgement and appreciation.

Ten original numbers (the majority written by pianist Foran) are predominantly vigorous, fiery, restless; and, crucially, their pressing momentum and chameleonic interest suggest an ongoing free-spiritedness which keeps these fifty-five minutes alive. Five fulfils all of that with an eager, breezy demeanour, its tensive pauses and melodic freedom easily redolent of Esbjörn Svensson, whilst the molten, repeating piano figures of John Parker’s Cells dissolve to create echoic, electronically enhanced pools of piano and percussion; and edgy, subtly dissonant Junk has grooving jazz at it heart. Rhythmically, Trichotomy are magnificent – Imaginary Limits‘ crisp dance groove fizzes to Parker’s percussion, though its irresistible appeal is undeniably down to all three (Foran’s distorted piano improvisations a delight); and the clattering, push-pull impatience of Asset or Liability feels gloriously anarchic.

The trio’s more calmative moments are no less inviting, partly due to their pervading uneasiness. Samuel Vincent’s softly-malleted, arco-bass Past Tense broods darkly; John Parker’s countrified, fireside folksong, It’s Strange Coming Back, seems quietly anguished. And that same ominousness from the drummer’s pen bursts into the urgent, prepared piano and Fender Rhodes groove of Reverie of Lack – this has alarming drama/thriller written all over it. Foran’s complex piano figure sets up panicky, irascible rock in Semi-Quasars; and levitational Hemmingway closes with snappy though sunnier rhythms enfolding its dreamy central section.

An ‘ear-catcher’ for contemporary piano trio lovers, Known-Unknown, by definition, offers the recognised exhilaration of Trichotomy with a profusion of unpredictable alleyways… and already enjoyed many, many times.

Released in February 2017. Available from Challenge Records, as well as Amazon, iTunes (and at Bandcamp, with a four-track EP alongside).

 

Sean Foran piano, electronics
John Parker drums, percussion, electronics
Sam Vincent double bass, electronics

trichotomymusic.com

Challenge Records – CR73439 (2017)

‘Frame of Reference’ – Sean Foran

seanforan

HIS FIRST ALBUM as leader, Australian pianist/composer Sean Foran’s Frame of Reference has already called me back time and time again to become immersed in its textural beauty.

In essence, that’s what the attraction is, and also what seems to have been in Foran’s mind as he explored the potential of this project. Known for his part in established piano trio Trichotomy, he envisaged chamber jazz to which artists he had long admired would bring their own character; and the specific instrumental line-up he imagined, creating its flow so evidently here, comprises guitarist Stuart McCallum, saxophonist Julian Arguelles, cellist Ben Davis and drummer Joost Hendrickx. Notably, the quintet first convened in the studio for the actual recording session – perhaps the key to the spontaneity of these eight absorbing tracks.

Foran’s fluvial pianism informs his music throughout, so that it either teems with sit-up-and-listen vitality or sparkles with rivulets of broken-chord elegance; yet it never brashly showboats, therefore allowing his colleagues the freedom to break out of the scored passages. Opening track Room with a View is many-hued, as if painting ever-changing climatic conditions’ effects across a lake. Here, piano ostinati are flecked with subtle electronics or vibraphone-like Rhodes embellishments and Arguelles’ strong alto melodies glide over rhythmically propulsive percussion. Foran’s ability to markedly change his colour palette is particularly attractive, Une Fille‘s full-band buoyancy eddying quietly into legato piano interludes, with McCallum’s mobility across the frets sounding remarkably sitar-like; and Ben Davis’ diverse cello voicings, displayed well in title track Frame of Reference, provide a refreshing change of timbre to more usual double bass.

Blue-sky Dare to Dream treads a delightfully simple groove, but it’s how Foran manages its instrumental light and shade which impresses so much; like a master distiller, he draws together the various streams to create musical nectar. Arguelles’ soprano eases out over the limpid, chamber feel of A Fine Balance before the piece’s invigorating, downward glissade, whilst Quiet Times‘ eventual, not-so-placid arrival finds McCallum’s guitar in a particularly fine improvisational swirl. Mish Mash alternates between folksy, new-age delicacy and Joost Hendrickx’s snappy, complex rhythms, and The Sum Of‘s closing, spacial chill-out is, at times, redolent of early Mike Oldfield (maybe that’s the gorgeously open guitar tone over Foran’s transcendental blend).

As with so much original jazz, don’t let this album rumble on in the background; it’s the compositional attention to detail and varietally improvised nuances which create the magnetism, along with a distinct air of equilibrium.

Released on 2 September 2016, Frame of Reference is available from Discovery Records, Bandcamp and record stores. Promo video here.

 

Sean Foran piano, Rhodes
Stuart McCallum guitars
Julian Arguelles saxophones
Ben Davis cello
Joost Hendrickx drums

seanforanmusic.info

Jazzhead Records – HEAD222 (2016)